High Altitude Energy: A History of Fossil Fuels in Colorado

By Lee Scamehorn | Go to book overview

9

Energy Crisis 1973—1985

The demand for energy within the United States and worldwide had been closing in on available supplies since the end of World War II. However, most Americans were unaware of a pending shortage, or that it was approaching crisis proportions, until an interruption in imports sent oil prices skyrocketing. The end of abundant cheap energy threatened to undermine a highly materialistic lifestyle based on large-volume, often wasteful, consumption of fossil fuels. A shortage of energy—especially oil— and its spiraling cost altered, at least in the short run, social as well as economic behavior and forced people to make what were often painful adjustments to a new reality of high-cost energy. For a time, the nation's resolve to regain energy self-sufficiency resulted in efforts to expand domestic production of coal, oil, and natural gas. Simultaneously, a variety of new technologies were explored as means of producing synthetic and alternative fuels.

What most people called an “energy crisis” seemed to suddenly materialize in October 1973, when representatives of Arab oil-producing nations, meeting in Kuwait, announced a sharp increase in the price of crude and a reduction of 5 percent a month in the export of oil until Israel, then caught up in the Yom Kippur War, withdrew from all territory taken from its Arab neighbors. This announcement was quickly superseded by a total

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
High Altitude Energy: A History of Fossil Fuels in Colorado
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • High Altitude a History of Fossil Fuels in Colorado Energy *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • 1 - King Coal 1860—1930 *
  • 2 - Smelter Fuel 1877—1930 *
  • 3 - Lamp Oil to Motor Fuel 1860—1930 *
  • 4 - Lighting and Heating with Gas 1870—1930 *
  • 5 - Coal from Bust to Boom Again, 1930 —1973 *
  • 6 - Fuel for the Car Culture 1930—1973 *
  • 7 - Natural Gas 1930—1973 *
  • 8 - Synthetic Fuels 1917—1973 *
  • 9 - Energy Crisis 1973—1985 *
  • 10 - Beyond the Energy Crisis *
  • Bibliographical Essay *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.