Some Aspects of Printing, Old and New

By Daniel Berkeley Updike | Go to book overview

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY PRESSES

WHETHER American University Presses so-called are always worthy of a university, and what their needs and aims are, from a typographical and scholarly point of view, I propose to consider briefly in these pages. There are more university presses in the United States than in any other country in the world or in all other countries combined. The last sixty or seventy years have seen their rise. For my purpose I define a university as any institution of learning that so describes itself and grants accredited degrees for scholarship. Not all these soi-disant university presses are what their names imply. I suspect that some of them are the result of that sort of emulation which forces minor colleges to inaugurate certain courses of study, not because they are needed but because other larger institutions offer them. While almost every important college or university has some sort of publication or printing agency--whatever may be its official title--like applicants for positions in a printing-house, these fall into sub-divisions.

In the first category are commercial printing presses not officially connected with the college they serve but which use a college or university press imprint on work for the institution. Another class has some official connection with the university and takes care of its printing. They might describe themselves more accurately--and modestly--as "Printers to the University." Such presses do not publish books at all, so no equipment for publication is needful. To adopt the no-

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Some Aspects of Printing, Old and New
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Foreword 1
  • Gutenberg And His Relation to Printers Today 5
  • The Essentials Of a Well-Made Book 23
  • Some Tendencies in Modern Typography 41
  • The Place of the Educated Man In the Printing Industry 50
  • American University Presses 60
  • A Last Word 72
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