Musical Works and Performances: A Philosophical Exploration

By Stephen Davies | Go to book overview

Preface

In this book, I try to avoid the narrow parochialism that so far has distinguished musical aesthetics. Most philosophers of music (myself included) have concentrated on musical works to the exclusion of performances, on the listener's perspective to the exclusion of the composer's and the performer's, and on Western classical music to the exclusion both of popular forms of Western music and of non-Western varieties. This is as understandable as it is regrettable: one can philosophize convincingly only about what one knows deeply, and most philosophers of music know more about listening to the works of Western art music than they do about other kinds. Indeed, there is so much variety in musical kinds and practices across the world, and it is usually so difficult to penetrate the subtle complexities of any given genre, that few people pretend to a grasp of more than a few types. Appreciating the blues could be the hard work of a lifetime, and who then has the leisure to master the music of the central African pygmies, or Chinese opera?

I have done what I can to adopt a broader perspective here—for instance, I discuss the great gamelan traditions of Indonesia and the songs of the Beatles alongside the works of Beethoven and Brahms—but I am very aware of the limitations of my musical knowledge. My own thinking has been considerably stimulated by writings that approach music more from the performer's side (Paul Thom, Stan Godlovitch), that discuss jazz (Philip Alperson, Lee B. Brown) and rock (Theodore Gracyk), and that make reference to non-Western musics (John Andrew Fisher, Kathleen Higgins). I look forward to the time when the philosophical conversation about music is enriched by consideration of a yet wider range of musical genres, issues, and areas.

A project of these dimensions relies on the advice, help, goodwill, encouragement, support, and knowledge of many people. I am deeply grateful for the assistance I have received not only from those already mentioned but also from Lisa Allcott, Allan Beever, Alison Booth, Gillian Brock, Philip Brownlee, Jacques Brunet, Sue Carole DeVale, Warren Drake, Denis Dutton, John Elmsly, Bob Ewin, Ed Herbst, Jennifer Judkins, Andrew Kania, Constantijn Koopman, Uli Kozok, Jerrold Levinson, Fiona McAlpine, Graham MacCrae, Jonathan McKeown, Andrew Milne, Richard Moyle, John Rimmer, Fran Rudegair, Sam Sampson, Kendall Walton, Susan Pratt Walton, Raymond Weisling, and two anonymous referees for Oxford University Press.

I owe a special debt to my Balinese friends and advisers, Anak Agung Gedé Oka Dalem of Peliatan, Dewa Putu Berata of Pengosekan, I Ketut Madra of Peliatan, I Nyoman Sudarna of Denpasar, I Wayan Gandra of Petulu,

-v-

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Musical Works and Performances: A Philosophical Exploration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Musical Works and Performances iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Part One Works, Their Instances, and Notations 1
  • 1: Musical Works 6
  • 2: Elements of Musical Works 45
  • 3: Notations 99
  • 4: Performances 151
  • Part Two Performance, Culture, and Recording 199
  • 5: Authenticity in Western Classical Music 206
  • 6: Authenticity and Non-Western Music 254
  • 7: Recordings 295
  • References 341
  • Index 362
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