Musical Works and Performances: A Philosophical Exploration

By Stephen Davies | Go to book overview

2 Elements of Musical Works

There is only one firm intuition here, and it is that work identity is preserved just so long as structural integrity is preserved. Indeed, so strong is that intuition that we do not even require absolute preservation of structure; that is to say, we only require that structural relations be preserved. . . Performing a Bach fugue with a choir of kazoos may, of itself (although not necessarily), make it a very bad performance; of that there can be no possible doubt. But it cannot, of itself, make the performance a performance of something else.

(Kivy 1988a : 45, 55)

Consisting essentially of nine repetitions of the same sinuous melody and countermelody, varied almost exclusively through changes in instrumentation, [Ravel's Bolero] would make no sense if rendered on, say, two pianos. . . Nor would it make the sense Ravel gave it if comparable instrumental variety was retained, but not the particular sequence of changes that Ravel prescribed. For example, nothing can substitute for the heightening of sultriness and sassiness Ravel achieves by introducing the tenor, soprano, and sopranino saxes as carriers of his countermelody about halfway through, after all the more reserved and conventional woodwinds have had their say.

(Levinson 1990a : 247)

In this chapter I discuss elements crucial to the identity of musical works. I begin with sound structures, because it is generally agreed that these are central to any piece's singularity. Later, I ask if its instrumentation also contributes essentially to a piece's being the one it is. Finally, I consider issues of ontological contextualism—that is, I enquire whether relations between a piece's raw musical content and the socio-musical setting in which it is created generate features vital to its identity. Before getting down to these tasks, it is important to draw attention to several methodological issues.

When we set out to characterize the nature of limestone, we search for properties displayed by all and only its instances. If not all bits of

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Musical Works and Performances: A Philosophical Exploration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Musical Works and Performances iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Part One Works, Their Instances, and Notations 1
  • 1: Musical Works 6
  • 2: Elements of Musical Works 45
  • 3: Notations 99
  • 4: Performances 151
  • Part Two Performance, Culture, and Recording 199
  • 5: Authenticity in Western Classical Music 206
  • 6: Authenticity and Non-Western Music 254
  • 7: Recordings 295
  • References 341
  • Index 362
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 374

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.