Preface

Starting from an analytical base, this book tries to explain and highlight some of the fundamental issues at stake in the further development of Europe as a regional economic and political entity, and the key choices associated with those issues. It goes beyond the narrow confines of a strictly academic work, seeking to engage the generally informed reader and thus contribute to the ongoing debate on the future of Europe. It is, perhaps, ambitious, but also consistent with its main premise that issues pertaining to the integration of Europe need to become more political.

It has taken more than a year to write this book, and many more years to distil the ideas contained in it. Ideas have been borrowed from different sources, and some of them may now be difficult to trace or recognize in their original form. I have drawn from long experience as academic and researcher in different countries, as well as from those shorter periods that I have spent in the private sector and in public policy-making; and indeed from the continuing and constantly enriching experience of trying to be an active citizen of Europe in the making.

The ideas contained in this book have been tested before many different audiences, ranging from students to practitioners, all over Europe and elsewhere. This book would have been impossible to write without the inspiration, information, and rich feedback I have received from a wide variety of people. Even in a peripatetic existence, some stopovers last longer than others. Athens, Oxford, London, Bruges, and Florence have been places where I have spent a good part of my life so far. I am grateful to all friends and colleagues for the privilege of learning from them.

I am especially grateful to Helen Wallace and William Wallace for their detailed comments and valuable advice on earlier drafts, and to Chris Hill, Nikos Koutsiaras, George Pagoulatos, and Xavier Prats for their critical comments and suggestions. I should like to thank Susan Woodward, André Sapir, and Panos Tsakloglou for their help on individual chapters, and Marta Arpio for her advice on legal matters. Dimitris Bourikos has provided valuable assistance in the collection of statistical data and the preparation of figures and tables, while Vivian Politou has done an excellent job in helping to keep many loose threads together.

-ix-

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What Kind of Europe?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • What Kind of Europe? iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: What Kind of Europe? 1
  • Part I Taking Stock 11
  • 2: The Gap Between Politics and Economics—or, Perception and Reality 13
  • 3: Winners and Losers . . . 43
  • 4: And the Rest of the World 66
  • Part II the Main Challenges Ahead 93
  • 5: Economic Governance and Policy Choices 95
  • 6: Emu: A Unifying Factor 142
  • 7: Extending Pax Europea 167
  • Part III Conclusions 201
  • 8: What is at Stake? 203
  • Select Bibliography 223
  • Figures and Table 232
  • Abbreviations 233
  • Index 235
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