1 What Kind of Europe?

Europe is changing fast, and if anything the pace of change is accelerating. Many things that would have been unthinkable ten or fifteen years ago are indeed happening, and the everyday lives of citizens are being directly affected. Since 1 January 2002 twelve countries of Europe have replaced their national currencies with the euro, also abandoning in the process any semblance of monetary sovereignty. Several others are considering doing the same, while some of their less fortunate fellow Europeans are simply reconciling themselves to the idea of a de facto euro standard for their domestic economies. Meanwhile, former communist countries of central and eastern Europe, a good number of them currently led by former communists born again as social democrats and now elected under the rules of 'bourgeois democracy', have been agitating to join the club in which their counterparts in western Europe have been slowly and painfully learning ways and means of sharing sovereignty and jointly managing their capitalist economies: a club officially known as the European Union (EU).

Societies that had been long accustomed to sending many of their young and dynamic members abroad in search of jobs and a better future, a tradition which has marked their literature and popular music, have in recent years been trying to adjust to waves of immigrants, often from faraway countries. Other societies with long histories of immigration and valiant efforts at multiculturalism are now experiencing a backlash from sizeable sections of their population which believe that the number of foreigners in their country has risen beyond the threshold of tolerance—and this has become a major political issue. Meanwhile, as the internal aspects of national security increasingly

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What Kind of Europe?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • What Kind of Europe? iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: What Kind of Europe? 1
  • Part I Taking Stock 11
  • 2: The Gap Between Politics and Economics—or, Perception and Reality 13
  • 3: Winners and Losers . . . 43
  • 4: And the Rest of the World 66
  • Part II the Main Challenges Ahead 93
  • 5: Economic Governance and Policy Choices 95
  • 6: Emu: A Unifying Factor 142
  • 7: Extending Pax Europea 167
  • Part III Conclusions 201
  • 8: What is at Stake? 203
  • Select Bibliography 223
  • Figures and Table 232
  • Abbreviations 233
  • Index 235
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