Select Bibliography

Chapter 1 What Kind of Europe?

Writing on Europe, and European integration in particular, has been a popular pastime for authors from different academic disciplines and occupations, covering a very wide range from the general and abstract to the pedantic. The bibliographical references given below are therefore only an indicative list chosen from an extremely rich literature.

For a fascinating history of Europe, from the ice age to the cold war, see Norman Davies, A History of Europe (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996). For an extremely well-written study of the twentieth century, see Mark Mazower, Dark Continent (London: Allen Lane, 1998); and for a comprehensive history of ideas about Europe and European identity, see Anthony Pagden (ed.), The Idea of Europe: From Antiquity to the European Union (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002).

On federalism, the literature is rich in number but of highly uneven quality. One of the better works is Dusan Sidjanski, The Federal Future of Europe: From the European Community to the European Union (Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2000).

There are many introductory books on European integration. Among the better ones are John Pinder, The Building of the European Union, 3rd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998); and Desmond Dinan, Ever Closer Union: An Introduction to European Integration (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1999). See also the special fortieth anniversary issue of the Journal of Common Market Studies, 40/4 (2002), one of the leading journals in the field.

Larry Siedentop, Democracy in Europe (London: Allen Lane, 2000) offers a fresh look by an outsider, arguing that the process of integration poses a serious threat to democracy in Europe. The reader may also want to consult the web site of the European Convention for the current debate on the future of Europe, although trying to separate the wheat from the chaff may prove to be an extremely time-consuming exercise: .

Two French authors provide a tentative political answer to the question 'What kind of Europe?': see Pascal Lamy and Jean Pisani-Ferry, The Europe We Want (London: Arch Press, 2002).

Donald Puchala is the author of the highly perceptive article 'Of Blind Men, Elephants and International Integration', Journal of Common Market Studies, 10/3 (1972), which points out the difficulties and risks of going for the overall picture as opposed to narrow specialization. It could have served as a warning to the author of this book.

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What Kind of Europe?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • What Kind of Europe? iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: What Kind of Europe? 1
  • Part I Taking Stock 11
  • 2: The Gap Between Politics and Economics—or, Perception and Reality 13
  • 3: Winners and Losers . . . 43
  • 4: And the Rest of the World 66
  • Part II the Main Challenges Ahead 93
  • 5: Economic Governance and Policy Choices 95
  • 6: Emu: A Unifying Factor 142
  • 7: Extending Pax Europea 167
  • Part III Conclusions 201
  • 8: What is at Stake? 203
  • Select Bibliography 223
  • Figures and Table 232
  • Abbreviations 233
  • Index 235
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