The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes

By Charles Wesley; Kenneth G. C. Newport | Go to book overview

Sermon 1 Philippians 3: 13-14

Introductory Comment

Charles's MS of this sermon is dated 21 October, 1735 and carries the further inscription 'on board the Simmonds'. In the 1816 edition there is an editorial note prefixed which reads 'Preached on board the Simmonds', 1 but there is no independent evidence that Charles preached this sermon on that day. No section of the journal covering that period is extant. It was on this same day, however, that John Wesley described in his journal the way in which he, his brother, Mr Delamotte, and Mr Ingham spent their time on board the ship. During the hours from nine to twelve, said John, 'my brother writ sermons'. 2 How many of the days of the journey Charles spent in this way cannot be ascertained. On this particular day, however, he clearly did engage in this activity; it may be that 21 October was the date of Charles's composition (or transcription) rather than delivery. Possibly significant for the date is the fact that the sermon closes with the Collect for the second Sunday after Trinity, though Charles's use of this Collect probably has more to do with the content of the sermon than with the Church calendar.

There is no indication on the MS to suggest that the sermon was copied from John. Indeed, though John preached from Philippians 3: 13-14 three times, there is no record of his doing so before 1741. 3 This fact and other indications of the sermon's originating with Charles have already been discussed in Chapter 4 . The conclusion of that discussion was that in this sermon we have an early, probably the earliest surviving 4 , example of a complete sermon by Charles.

The MS is located at the John Rylands University Library of Manchester. 5 It comprises 14 leaves (7 folded sheets) which have been stitch-bound into booklet form. Leaf 1 comprises the cover and is written recto only. The sermon itself is found on leaves 2-14; 2-13 are written recto and verso and leaf 14 recto only. With one minor exception, 6 the sermon is written in longhand throughout.

It was published as sermon XI in the 1816 edition, though as with all of the texts in that volume there are major differences between the MS form and what was published. Thus, for example, the words 'Christian Perfection is the goal of our religious race; the stand whereon our crown of reward is placed', found on page 14 of the MS, appear in the 1816 edition as 'Christian perfection, or universal holiness, is the goal of our religious course', where both the addition of 'or universal holiness' and the omission of 'the stand whereon

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Sermons of Charles Wesley iii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Part I Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 Charles Wesley and Early Methodism 3
  • Chapter 2 Charles Wesley, Preacher 28
  • Chapter 3 Theological Characteristics and Use of Sources 48
  • Chapter 4 Charles Wesley's Sermon Corpus 71
  • Part II the Sermons 91
  • Sermon 1 Philippians 3: 13-14 93
  • Sermon 2 1 Kings 18: 21 107
  • Sermon 3 Psalm 126: 7 123
  • Sermon 4 1 John 3: 14 130
  • Sermon 5 Titus 3: 8 152
  • Sermon 6 Romans 3: 23-4 167
  • Sermon 7 Romans 3: 23-5 183
  • Sermon 8 Ephesians 5: 14 211
  • Sermon 9 Psalm 46: 8 225
  • Sermon 10 John 8: 1-11 238
  • Sermon 11 John 4: 41 259
  • Sermon 12 Luke 18: 9-14 268
  • Sermon 13 Acts 20: 7 277
  • Sermon 14 Luke 16: 10 287
  • Sermon 15 Matthew 5: 20 298
  • Sermon 16 Matthew 6: 22-3 306
  • Sermon 17 Luke 16: 8 314
  • Sermon 18 John 13: 7 325
  • Sermon 19 Exodus 20: 8 335
  • Sermon 20 Mark 12: 30 346
  • Sermon 21 Luke 10: 42 360
  • Sermon 22 Proverbs 11: 30 369
  • Sermon 23 Psalm 91: 11 380
  • Bibliography 391
  • Scriptural Index 397
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.