The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes

By Charles Wesley; Kenneth G. C. Newport | Go to book overview

Sermon 16 Matthew 6: 22-3

Introductory Comment

This is a sermon which Charles preached several times, both in America and in England. The earliest date given is 14 March, 1736, when Charles preached it in Frederica (the date is confirmed in the journal). 1 The latest is 1 May, 1737, when he preached it in Oxford. 2 The other dates are given as 23 May, 1736 (in Savannah) 3 and 24 April, 1736 (Aston and Wickham). 4 Charles preached on the same topic on 13 March, 1746, but it is not certain that he used this MS. 5

There is no doubt that this is a sermon which Charles copied from John. He says as much in a shorthand note at the conclusion. According to this he transcribed it on 4 February, 1736, while still on board the Simmonds. John had composed the sermon at sea and in the wake of a storm, but also in anticipation of a safe arrival in America. 6 The extent to which Charles altered his brother's sermon in the process of transcription cannot be ascertained. However, as is often the case, there is some textual evidence that he did do so. This is brought out more fully in the notes to the sermon itself, but we may note here in passing that Charles's numbering of the paragraphs is not consistent. For example, under the 'second head' he has points 1-3 in order. Point 4 is point 4a and what was originally listed as point 5 has been changed to point 4. These changes appear to be in the hand of Charles. There is then no point 5, one point 6 and two points 7. Of course this may be interpreted as being simply sloppiness in transcription on Charles's part, but if so it is rather uncharacteristic. Alternatively, one might suggest that Charles has omitted John's original point 5 and expanded his point 4 into two separate points (now points 4a and 4). Point 6 has been left as it was. Charles has then added his own point 7 and also left John's intact, but failed to 'correct' the original numbering. This is no more than speculation, but it is not unreasonable, and no less likely than simply assuming that Charles was sloppy, which would not itself explain his use of 4a and 4. There has also been an addition at the end of point 2 and the words to be inserted have been written on the verso of the preceding leaf. Again, this might just indicate that Charles was less than careful and had to backtrack to make a

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The Sermons of Charles Wesley: A Critical Edition, with Introduction and Notes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Sermons of Charles Wesley iii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Part I Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 Charles Wesley and Early Methodism 3
  • Chapter 2 Charles Wesley, Preacher 28
  • Chapter 3 Theological Characteristics and Use of Sources 48
  • Chapter 4 Charles Wesley's Sermon Corpus 71
  • Part II the Sermons 91
  • Sermon 1 Philippians 3: 13-14 93
  • Sermon 2 1 Kings 18: 21 107
  • Sermon 3 Psalm 126: 7 123
  • Sermon 4 1 John 3: 14 130
  • Sermon 5 Titus 3: 8 152
  • Sermon 6 Romans 3: 23-4 167
  • Sermon 7 Romans 3: 23-5 183
  • Sermon 8 Ephesians 5: 14 211
  • Sermon 9 Psalm 46: 8 225
  • Sermon 10 John 8: 1-11 238
  • Sermon 11 John 4: 41 259
  • Sermon 12 Luke 18: 9-14 268
  • Sermon 13 Acts 20: 7 277
  • Sermon 14 Luke 16: 10 287
  • Sermon 15 Matthew 5: 20 298
  • Sermon 16 Matthew 6: 22-3 306
  • Sermon 17 Luke 16: 8 314
  • Sermon 18 John 13: 7 325
  • Sermon 19 Exodus 20: 8 335
  • Sermon 20 Mark 12: 30 346
  • Sermon 21 Luke 10: 42 360
  • Sermon 22 Proverbs 11: 30 369
  • Sermon 23 Psalm 91: 11 380
  • Bibliography 391
  • Scriptural Index 397
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