The Suffering of the Impassible God: The Dialectics of Patristic Thought

By Paul L. Gavrilyuk | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

When one dares to shed a new light upon the issues of perpetual significance, such as the question of God's involvement in suffering, one is humbled by the thought that one stands on the shoulders of the giants. I found it impossible, however, to keep the acrobatic posture all the time, and have on occasions resorted to dancing on the graves of the great. I was particularly concerned to refute Adolf Harnack's view that in the patristic period the message of the Bible was corrupted by Hellenistic philosophy, taking the issue of the divine impassibility as a limiting case. Further demolition work in this arena is needed, since at least in the assessment of divine impassibility, Harnack's thesis still reigns supreme in the minds of many modern theologians, who in one form or another support the claim that God suffers.

On a positive side, I owe a debt of gratitude to several people, among both the living and the dead. Among the ancients, it is two illustrious Alexandrians, St Athanasius and St Cyril, who have remained my theological beacons through these years. Among those of modern times, the writings of my eminent countryman, Fyodor Dostoevsky, provided the first existential impetus for me to dive into the deep waters of the problem of God's response to suffering.

No written word will adequately capture the profound impact that William Abraham has had upon my life and studies at the Southern Methodist University. This book is a token of gratitude for all the joys of philosophical friendship that we shared at the SMU.

A special word of appreciation goes to William S. Babcock, for supervising my doctoral research and for making numerous invaluable comments on the typescript of the book at various stages of its development.

Further thanks are due to my colleagues at the University of St Thomas: Joseph Hallman, Michael Hollerich, and John Martens, who were most generous with their time and critical observations.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Suffering of the Impassible God: The Dialectics of Patristic Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.