6 Black Sea, 1860-1990

I wish Europe would let Russia annihilate Turkey a little—not much, but enough to make it difficult to find the place again without a divining-rod or a diving-bell.

Mark Twain, 1867

The passengers were a perfect babel, representing and speaking all the tongues of the East, with several Europeans mixed in, each wearing his own peculiar costume. There were Turks of all kinds and all classes and all ages wearing fezzes of red felt; there were Persians, wearing fezzes of black lamb's-wool; Albanians with fezzes of white felt, and Jews with turbans and long robes such as they used to wear in the days of the scriptures. … There were English, German, and French tourists and rug buyers on their way to Persia and Turkestan; a very fat Austrian woman who was going to visit her son, consul at Batoum, and several Russians who had been visiting Paris and the Riviera and were on their way back to their homes in the Caucasus.

William Eleroy Curtis, reporter for the Chicago Record-Herald,

on a ship off Trabzon, 1910

In their luxurious and comfortable villas along the Black Sea coast, connected by highways illuminated as if by fairy dust, the capitalist money grubbers once lived it up at the expense of the workers. … For the region that it traverses, the Canal will have a revolutionary role. It will bring a new life, a life fundamentally different from the sorrows of the past.

Gheorghe Hossu, director of construction on the Danube-Black

Sea canal, People's Republic of Romania, 1950

-187-

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The Black Sea: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Also by Charles King ii
  • The Black Sea iii
  • About the Author vi
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • On Names xi
  • List of Plates xiv
  • List of Maps xvi
  • 1: An Archaeology of Place 1
  • 2: Pontus Euxinus, 700 Bc-Ad 500 23
  • 3: Mare Maggiore, 500-1500 63
  • 4: Kara Deniz, 1500-1700 109
  • 5: Chernoe More, 1700-1860 137
  • 6: Black Sea, 1860-1990 187
  • 7: Facing the Water 237
  • Bibliography and Further Reading 251
  • Index 263
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