Emin Pasha and the Rebellion at the Equator: A Story of Nine Months' Experience in the Last of the Soudan Provinces

By A. J. Mounteney Jophson; Henry M. Stanley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III. FROM WADELAI TO DUFILÉ.

Arrival at Wadelai -- Emin's compound and house -- Signor Marco -- Farida -- Emin's scientific proclivities -- Wadelai Station -- The Wa-huma -- Reminiscences of Sir Samuel Baker -- Nyadué, or the Morning Star -- Deputation from 1st Battalion -- Endeavour to relieve Fort Bodo -- Faratch Aga -- State of affairs at Rejaf -- Hamad Aga's estimate of Emin -- Doubts as to Emin's wisdom -- Faratch Aga's shame -- Emin acts a farce -- Ferocity of Crocodiles -- Bari crocodile-hunters -- Answer of soldiers of Wadelai -- Emin's ivory -- Start for Dufilé -- Blocks on the Nile -- We reach Dufilé -- Curious custom -- Description of Dufié Station -- Government buildings -- Hawashi Effendi -- Hawashi Effendi's estimate of Egyptian guile -- An Arab feast -- Hawashi Effendi's warning -- More doubts.

AT 11.30 we reached Wadelai. The soldiers were all drawn up and saluted their Governor in the usual way. This being Emin's head-quarters and the seat of government, the soldiers were all picked men and were much better dressed than those in the other stations, and there was a perfect regiment of clerks and officials of all sorts dressed in flowing white cotton cloth robes. A guard of honour, playing a lively tune, escorted us through the station to Emin's divan, which was a large round hut made of bamboo; it was nicely furnished and had a homelike air about it. Two large bookcases full of books greatly added to the look of comfort. Here all the officials, military and civil, came in to greet

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