Emin Pasha and the Rebellion at the Equator: A Story of Nine Months' Experience in the Last of the Soudan Provinces

By A. J. Mounteney Jophson; Henry M. Stanley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X ARRIVAL OF THE MAHDI'S FORCES.

THE Mahdists are upon us -- General consternation -- Intelligence department -- Council called in haste -- Soldiers are despatched to Rejaf -- Defenceless state of the Province -- Arrival of the Peacock dervishes -- The Bible and the Sword -- Letter from the Mahdist general -- Emin commanded to surrender -- Rebels ask Emin's advice -- Abderrahim, son of Osman Latif -- His courageous behaviour -- The rebels' plans -- The dervishes are examined -- The Khartoum steamers -- Royle's book on Egypt -- Stores in the arsenal of Khartoum -- Fugitives arrive in Dufilé -- Robbery and violence among the soldiers -- Emin's unselfishness -- Letter from Osman Latif -- The blow falls -- Rejaf taken -- General rising of the natives -- Torturing of the dervishes -- Brave fanatics -- More news of the fall of Rejaf -- A dangerous step to take -- Superstition of the soldiers -- Dufilé put into a defensive state -- My advice to the rebels -- Bravery of the dervishes -- Their cruel death -- Martyrdom.

SUDDENLY, on October 15th, in the midst of this inaction, the news came like a thunder-clap that the Mahdi's forces were once more upon them! A soldier had been dispatched in haste with a letter, and had travelled day and night to reach Dufilé. The news the letter contained was, that three steamers, with nine sandals and nuggars, had arrived at Lado from Khartoum; these steamers and boats were, the letter said, full of people. This news struck the rebels with consternation, trumpets were sounded, a council was hastily called, and the whole station was in an uproar. There were a few who declared that these must be people from the Egyptian Government, and

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