Scottish Puritanism, 1590-1638

By David George Mullan | Go to book overview

Preface

This study began its life in a rather modest attempt to evaluate the presence of Arminianism in Scotland c.1638. My initial labours produced a couple of essays looking at the theology of the decades before the National Covenant (28 February 1638) and the sentiments expressed in the Glasgow Assembly, thence leading to a consideration of what Arminianism meant in the mind of the Scottish covenanters through the 1640s. As I read the works of divinity I recognized that there was much else to be gleaned from these sources, and the result of that uninspired observation is this book.

My programme of research has taken me to Scotland on four different occasions for a total of nearly eighteen months, and to Guelph and other North American destinations for shorter periods of time. Along the way I have incurred a great many debts, intellectual and more personal, and the book serves to remind me of the warm humanity which so often characterizes the academic community. In addition, especially during my lengthy stays abroad, I have been befriended by others who have done much to make my visits enjoyable and fulfilling.

Above all, I am indebted to the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, for electing me a visiting research fellow in 1995 and allowing me to return in 1996 and 1998. Its director Professor Peter Jones and administrative assistant Anthea Taylor, along with a wide range of scholars from many disciplines and countries, contributed to a remarkable experience of the intellectual life which I shall always look back upon as a high point in my career. I first learned of the institute during my fellowship in the spring and summer of 1991 at the Calgary Institute for the Humanities. Like the mother house, the Calgary Institute provides a splendid environment for serious work, and although I did not know it at the time, the seeds of this book were actually sown during those four months; I am grateful to the then director Dr Harold Coward and the institute's staff for an enjoyable and productive term.

I have benefited from conversations with many people on both sides of the Atlantic, sometimes directing me to important sources. To attempt to

-vii-

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Scottish Puritanism, 1590-1638
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Scottish Puritanism 1590-1638 iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • List of Abbreviations xii
  • Prologue 1
  • 1: A Puritan Brotherhood 13
  • 2: A Ministry of the Word 45
  • 3: Conversion and Assurance 85
  • 4: The Pilgrim's Progress 111
  • 5: The Ambiguity of the Feminine 140
  • 6: Covenants and Covenant Theology 171
  • 7: A Schism Defined 208
  • 8: Political and National Divinity 244
  • 9: The Damnable Covenant 285
  • Epilogue 318
  • Bibliography 323
  • Index 361
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