Scottish Puritanism, 1590-1638

By David George Mullan | Go to book overview

7 A Schism Defined

'But 'twas all foreordered, and for the best.'

'Thou sayest well', returned David, 'and hast caught the true spirit of Christianity. He that is saved will be saved, and he that is predestined to be damned will be damned. This is the doctrine of the truth, and most consoling and refreshing it is to the true believer.'

James Fenimore Cooper,

The Last of the Mohicans (1826), ch. 12.

We have to believe in free will. We've got no choice.

Isaac Bashevis Singer, The Times, 21 June 1962. 1

I perceive you all curious to demand me a question, if modestie could permit you to speak, to wit, what is this that I know more than other men, let us (say ye) understand it, and we will yeeld to reason.

To this lawfull question I answer, that I know more than any Protestant in Scotland of this businesse; for I was imployed in it, the year of God 1632, and gave in . . . a petition to the foresaid Congregation at Rome, and elsewhere, desiring them to advise upon the meanes for the reduction of Scotland to Rome; diverse were proponed by these politick heads . . . 4. Yet this was all thought little of, by one of our Countriemen, who advised them to set their whole mindes for the perversion of England; which being neerer to them in points of doctrine, forme of service, worship, and ecclesiasticall government, they might work surer, and with greater hope of prevailing, then with his Countriemen, whom he assured to be of a stubborn nature, dangerous to be dealt with, and great Puritans, directly opposite to the church of Rome: And therefore nothing more should be desired them, but conformitie in matters of religion with England, which the English church would gladly wish, as if she were a mother church whereof others did flow.

Thomas Abernethy, Abjuration of poperie

(1638), 44-5.

-208-

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Scottish Puritanism, 1590-1638
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Scottish Puritanism 1590-1638 iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • List of Abbreviations xii
  • Prologue 1
  • 1: A Puritan Brotherhood 13
  • 2: A Ministry of the Word 45
  • 3: Conversion and Assurance 85
  • 4: The Pilgrim's Progress 111
  • 5: The Ambiguity of the Feminine 140
  • 6: Covenants and Covenant Theology 171
  • 7: A Schism Defined 208
  • 8: Political and National Divinity 244
  • 9: The Damnable Covenant 285
  • Epilogue 318
  • Bibliography 323
  • Index 361
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