Women and American Politics: New Questions, New Directions

By Susan J. Carroll | Go to book overview
academic and political worlds, has from its inception been concerned with conducting applied research and designing programs to bridge the gap between scholars and practitioners interested in women and politics.
8
Although this is, in general, an accurate statement, some important exceptions exist (e.g., Bystydzienski and Sekhon 1999 ; Jaquette and Wolchik 1998 ; Randall 1987 ; Katzenstein and Mueller 1987).
9
In addition, the June 2001 issue of PS: Political Science & Politics highlights articles that put women and politics scholarship in the United States in comparative perspective. The issue has a section entitled “Women in Comparative Perspective: Japan and the United States.”
10
“Gender Makes the World Go Round” is the title of the first chapter of Cynthia Enloe's book.

References

Alcoff, Linda. 1988. “Cultural Feminism Versus Post-Structuralism.” Signs 13: 405-36.

Amundsen, Kirsten. 1971. The Silenced Majority: Women and American Democracy. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.

Baker, Paula. 1990. “The Domestication of Politics: Women and American Political Society, 1780-1920.” In Women, the State, and Welfare, ed. Linda Gordon. Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin Press.

Beck, Susan Abrams. 2001. “Acting as Women: The Effects and Limitations of Gender in Local Governance.” In The Impact of Women in Public Office, ed. Susan J. Carroll. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Bleier, Ruth, ed. 1986. Feminist Approaches to Science. New York: Pergamon.

Boles, Janet K. 2001. “Local Elected Women and Policy-Making: Movement Delegates or Feminist Trustees?” In The Impact of Women in Public Office, ed. Susan J. Carroll. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Bookman, Ann, and Sandra Morgen, eds. 1988. Women and the Politics of Empowerment. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Bourque, Susan C., and Jean Grossholtz. 1974. “Politics an Unnatural Practice: Political Science Looks at Female Participation.” Politics and Society 4: 225-66.

Burns, Nancy, Kay Lehman Schlozman, and Sidney Verba. 2001. The Private Roots of Public Action: Gender, Equality, and Political Participation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Burrell, Barbara. 1994. A Woman's Place Is in the House. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Butler, Judith. 1990. “Gender Trouble, Feminist Theory, and Psychoanalytic Discourse.” In Feminism/Postmodernism, ed. Linda J. Nicholson. New York: Routledge.

Bystdzienski, Jill M., and Joti Sekhon. 1999. Democratization and Women's Grassroots Movements. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Carroll, Berenice A. 1979. “Political Science, Part I: American Politics and Political Behavior.” Signs 5: 289-306.

Carroll, Susan J. 1994. Women as Candidates in American Politics. 2nd ed. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

-25-

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Women and American Politics: New Questions, New Directions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Women and American Politics iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Contributors x
  • References 25
  • Part I Running for Public Office 31
  • 1: Accounting for Women's Political Involvement 33
  • References 49
  • 2: Campaign Strategy 53
  • References 68
  • 3: Money and Women's Candidacies for Public Office 72
  • References 85
  • Part II Other Aspects of Women's Participation in Electoral Politics 87
  • 4: The Impact of Women in Political Leadership Positions 89
  • 5: Women, Women's Organizations, and Political Parties 111
  • References 141
  • 6: The Gender Gap 146
  • References 166
  • Part III New Directions in Women and Politics Research 171
  • 7: Assessing the Media's Impact on the Political Fortunes of Women 173
  • References 187
  • 8: A Portrait of Continuing Marginality 190
  • References 210
  • 9: Broadening the Study of Women's Participation 214
  • References 229
  • Index 237
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