Women and American Politics: New Questions, New Directions

By Susan J. Carroll | Go to book overview

7 Assessing the Media's Impact on the Political Fortunes of Women

Kim Fridkin Kahn

How does the media influence women's role in politics? Given the pervasiveness of the media in our political system, this is an important question which remains greatly understudied. In this chapter, I begin by describing what we know about the media's treatment of women in politics. Next, I identify five potential areas of future research: (1)an analysis of the news treatment of women officeholders; (2)the effectiveness of women candidates' media strategies; (3) an investigation of how men and women politicians deal with the press when running for office and when governing; (4)an examination of how the gender of journalists influences the content and consequences of political information; and (5)an examination of how the media socialize children about the role of women in politics. In discussing future research questions, I offer some preliminary ideas regarding potential research designs.


Review of Literature

Women are largely under-represented in the media's presentation of news. In the first place, women are rarely used as sources in news stories, and when they are quoted, women are more likely to represent private citizens than experts or authorities. For example, Rakow and Kranich (1991), in their study of the three network news programs, found that women were used as on-camera sources only 15% of the time while men were sources 85% of the time. Budge (1996), in her study of national newspapers, reported a strikingly similar trend. Men were referred to or solicited for comment 85% of the time in stories reported on the front page while women were referred to only 15% of the time. Furthermore, men were four times as likely as women to be pictured on the front page.

Johnson and Christ (1988) examined how newsmakers have been covered in Time magazine and found that only 14% of the covers of Time have shown

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and American Politics: New Questions, New Directions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Women and American Politics iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Contributors x
  • References 25
  • Part I Running for Public Office 31
  • 1: Accounting for Women's Political Involvement 33
  • References 49
  • 2: Campaign Strategy 53
  • References 68
  • 3: Money and Women's Candidacies for Public Office 72
  • References 85
  • Part II Other Aspects of Women's Participation in Electoral Politics 87
  • 4: The Impact of Women in Political Leadership Positions 89
  • 5: Women, Women's Organizations, and Political Parties 111
  • References 141
  • 6: The Gender Gap 146
  • References 166
  • Part III New Directions in Women and Politics Research 171
  • 7: Assessing the Media's Impact on the Political Fortunes of Women 173
  • References 187
  • 8: A Portrait of Continuing Marginality 190
  • References 210
  • 9: Broadening the Study of Women's Participation 214
  • References 229
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.