Women and American Politics: New Questions, New Directions

By Susan J. Carroll | Go to book overview
12
The citations here could easily fill a book. The classics include Lorde 1984 ; Lewis 1977 ; Simons 1979 ; Dill 1983 ; Lugones and Spelman 1983 ; Klepfisz 1990 ; Kaye/Kantrowitz 1992 . For a recent attempt to incorporate these perspectives into a politics of “specificity, ” see Phelan 1994 . I explored these issues at greater length in Ackelsberg 1996 .
13
See, e.g., Brettschneider 1996 , Introduction.
14
There is an extensive and growing literature on patterns and/or determinants of women's participation in politics. See Payne 1990; Romer 1990 ; Katzenstein and Mueller 1987 ; and more recently, Flammang 1997 ; Cohen, Jones, and Tronto 1997 .

References

Ackelsberg, Martha. 1988. “Communities, Resistance, and Women's Activism: Some Implications for a Democratic Polity.” In Women and the Politics of Empowerment, ed. Ann Bookman and Sandra Morgen. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

—— 1991. Free Women of Spain: Anarchism and the Struggle for the Emancipation of Women. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

—— 1992. “Review Essay: Feminist Analyses of Public Policy.” Comparative Politics 24: 477-93.

—— 1994. “Dependency or Mutuality: A Feminist Perspective on Dilemmas of Welfare Reform.” Rethinking Marxism 7: 73-86.

—— 1996. “Identity Politics, Political Identities: Thoughts Toward a Multicultural Politics.” Frontiers: A Journal of Women's Studies 16: 87-100.

—— 1998. “Embracing Ambiguities: Exclusivity, Inclusivity, Activism and Citizenship.” Paper presented at the 1998 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston.

—— 2001. “(Re)Conceiving Politics? Women's Activism and Democracy in a Time of Retrenchment.” Feminist Studies 27(2): 391-418.

—— and Irene Diamond. 1987. “Gender and Political Life: New Directions in Political Science.” In Analyzing Gender: A Handbook of Social Science Research, ed. Beth B. Hess and Myra Marx Ferree. Newbury Park: Sage.

—— and Mary Lyndon Shanley. 1996. “Privacy, Publicity and Power: A Feminist Rethinking of the Public-Private Distinction.” In Revisioning the Political: Feminist Reconstructions of Traditional Concepts in Western Political Theory, ed. Nancy Hirschman and Christine DiStefano. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press.

Alinsky, Saul. 1969. Rules for Radicals. New York: Random House.

Amundsen, Kristen. 1977. A New Look at the Silenced Majority. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Baker, Paula. 1990. “The Domestication of Politics: Women and American Political Society, 1780-1920.” In Women, the State, and Welfare, ed. Linda Gordon. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Balbus, Isaac. 1982. Marxism and Domination. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Banfield, Edward C. 1974. “Rioting Mainly for Fun and Profit.” In The Unheavenly City Revisited, ed. Edward C. Banfield. Boston: Little, Brown.

-229-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and American Politics: New Questions, New Directions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Women and American Politics iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Contributors x
  • References 25
  • Part I Running for Public Office 31
  • 1: Accounting for Women's Political Involvement 33
  • References 49
  • 2: Campaign Strategy 53
  • References 68
  • 3: Money and Women's Candidacies for Public Office 72
  • References 85
  • Part II Other Aspects of Women's Participation in Electoral Politics 87
  • 4: The Impact of Women in Political Leadership Positions 89
  • 5: Women, Women's Organizations, and Political Parties 111
  • References 141
  • 6: The Gender Gap 146
  • References 166
  • Part III New Directions in Women and Politics Research 171
  • 7: Assessing the Media's Impact on the Political Fortunes of Women 173
  • References 187
  • 8: A Portrait of Continuing Marginality 190
  • References 210
  • 9: Broadening the Study of Women's Participation 214
  • References 229
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.