Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind

By Steven Nadler | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

A number of people were very helpful to me in providing comments on various draft versions of this work. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Lenn Goodman, Kenneth Katz, Larry Kohn, Michael Morgan, David Novak, Tamar Rudavsky, Donald Rutherford, and David Sorkin for their suggestions, criticisms, encouragement, and advice. I am extremely grateful—and very lucky—to have such generous friends and colleagues.

During the writing of the book I was able to benefit from the opportunity to present material from its central chapters to audiences at Princeton University, the University of Toronto, Washington University in St Louis, Rutgers University, Hebrew University (Jerusalem), and Ohio State University. I am grateful to my hosts for the invitations, and to the members of the audiences for the useful discussions that followed my presentations. Part of Chapter 6 was also presented to a conference entitled 'Spinoza and Judaism' at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the comments I received there from an eclectic gathering of specialists on Spinoza and Jewish Studies were invaluable.

I want also to thank the Koret Foundation and the National Foundation for Jewish Culture, who awarded Spinoza: A Life the 2000 Koret Jewish Book Award for biography. The support from that award was important, in many ways, to my being able to complete this book.

Finally, I am, once again and as ever, full of gratitude and love to my wife, Jane, who still takes my breath away; and my children, Rose and Ben, to whom I was always impatient to return after getting some writing in, for yet another game of roughhouse.

-xiii-

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Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Spinoza's Heresy iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Contents xv
  • Abbreviations xvi
  • 1: Cherem in Amsterdam 1
  • 2: Abominations and Heresies 16
  • 3: Patriarchs, Prophets, and Rabbis 42
  • 4: The Philosophers 67
  • 5: Eternity and Immortality 94
  • 6: The Life of Reason 132
  • 7: Immortality on the Amstel 157
  • Conclusion 182
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 223
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