Political Choice in Britain

By Harold D. Clarke; David Sanders et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

This is a book about the political choices that British voters make. More precisely, it is about the decisions that they make in successive general elections. In each election, voters have two choices—first, whether to cast a ballot, and second, which party to choose. Since the first British Election Study (BES) some four decades ago, the emphasis has been very much on the second of these decisions, party choice. The prior, turnout decision has received very little attention. In the 1950s and 1960s, neglecting turnout seemed reasonable, or at least acceptable, since the vast majority of people regularly voted in general elections. That has changed. In 2001, less than three in five members of the eligible electorate went to the polls, thereby clearly signalling that the turnout decision has become an important aspect of electoral choice in contemporary Britain. Turnout and party choice both merit attention.

Viewed generally, the literature on electoral choice is dominated by two theoretical perspectives—what we call the sociological and individual rationality frameworks. These two frameworks subsume a wide variety of explanatory models. Historically, most studies of voting behaviour in Britain and elsewhere have adopted, and then strongly advocated, a single model within one of these two frameworks. Ensuing empirical analyses typically, and predictably, demonstrate the power of the preferred model. We contend that this research strategy imposes undesirable theoretical costs because the explanatory contributions and potential superiority of rival models are ignored. These costs may not be recoverable because national election studies are a very scarce commodity. Almost always there is only one study per research community per election cycle. When used to guide the construction of the survey instruments, the 'single model' approach means that the data needed to investigate the utility of a range of alternative models are often unavailable.

In Political Choice in Britain, we specify and test several rival explanatory models of electoral choice. As principal investigators of the 2001 BES, we explicitly designed the survey instruments with this goal in mind. Since electoral participation had been largely ignored in previous studies, we constructed substantial batteries of new questions to generate the data needed to test alternative models

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Choice in Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Political Choice in Britain iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Figures xiv
  • List of Tables xvii
  • Appendix a 2001 Bes Data Used in This Book 329
  • References 345
  • Name Index 363
  • Subject Index 367
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.