Russia in Afghanistan and Chechnya: Military Strategic Culture and the Paradoxes of Asymmetric Conflict

By Robert M. Cassidy | Go to book overview

RUSSIA IN AFGHANISTAN AND CHECHNYA:
MILITARY STRATEGIC CULTURE AND THE
PARADOXES OF ASYMMETRIC CONFLICT

INTRODUCTION

The enemy's objective is to have us concentrate our main florces flor a decisive engagement. Our objective is exactly the opposite. We want to choose conditions flavorable to us, concentrate superior florces and flight decisive campaigns and battles only when we are sure ofl victory, ... we want to avoid decisive engagements under unflavorable conditions when we are not sure ofl victory.

Mao Tse-Tung 1

On Christmas Eve in 1979, Soviet florces conducted a conventional assault on Kabul and other key points in Aflghanistan with the aim ofl implanting a stable Soviet-flriendly government and ofl quelling an insurrection. Almost 10 years later, Soviet florces withdrew aflter suflflering close to 14,000 killed, leaving behind a very precarious pro-Soviet government and an ongoing civil war. In December 1994, Russian florces invaded Chechnya, employing almost the same conventional template used in Aflghanistan. On New Year's Eve 1994, Russian florces launched their main assault on Grozny, initially suflflering huge losses and meeting with flailure. The goals in Chechnya were almost the same as the goals sought in Aflghanistan 15 years earlier—to implant a pro-Russian government and to stabilize the Chechen republic. Russian florces pulled out ofl Chechnya almost 2 years later aflter suflflering close to 6000 killed, having flailed to meet their objectives. As a great power, the Soviet Union flailed to win a small war in Aflghanistan. As a flormer great power, Russia flailed to win in Chechnya.

In both cases, Soviet/Russian florces possessed a technological advantage and a latent numerical advantage

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Russia in Afghanistan and Chechnya: Military Strategic Culture and the Paradoxes of Asymmetric Conflict
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 75

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.