Women Take Care: Gender, Race and the Culture of AIDS

By Katie Hogan | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Within a nine-year period in the late 1980s and early 1990s, I lost my sister, her husband, and their two-year-old son to AIDS. Not long after, my fourteen-year-old niece, one of my sister's two surviving children, committed suicide. The circumstances surrounding their deaths have compelled me to write this book as a coping mechanism, a way of understanding. My sister, Mary, would have preferred that I drop out of graduate school and return to be with her in the small, lower-middle-class town where we both grew up. From Mary's perspective, such a move would have been far more helpful to her than what I was trying to do: survive the dual pressures of graduate school and AIDS through writing.

I realize that I cannot speak for my sister. My rendering of her views and experiences in these pages is no more fixed than my own writerly persona. But as a witness to some of my sister's experiences, I have come to see the themes of silence, representation, and HIV in a new light. What I saw Mary do in response to HIV was what I saw much AIDS literature and visual culture do: approach the topic by glorifying the elevated abstraction of the mother / good woman as a way of tempering the degraded meanings associated with HIV. 1 The problem with such a strategy is that it silences the lives of flesh-and-blood women and distorts the realities and struggles of those who have died.

For Mary, as for most women who have AIDS or are HIV positive, AIDS was just one of many difficulties. Owing to the many problems that had

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Take Care: Gender, Race and the Culture of AIDS
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Women Take Care - Gender, Race, and the Culture of Aids *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Chapter 1 - Women and Aids Paradox of Visibility *
  • Chapter 2 - Little Eva Revisited *
  • Chapter 3 - Absent Mothers and Missing Children *
  • Chapter 4 - The Lesbian Mammy *
  • Chapter 5 - What Looks like Progress Black Feminist Narratives on Hiv/Aids *
  • Conclusion - Beyond Sentimental Aids *
  • Notes *
  • Works Cited *
  • Index *
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.