Governing Europe

By Jack Hayward; Anand Menon | Go to book overview

Foreword

Vincent Wright: Engagement with History, Political Science, and Economics

Tony Atkinson

Vincent and I both contributed to A New Handbook of Political Science (Goodin and Klingemann 1996) chapters subtitled 'Old and New'. (His chapter, with Guy Peters, was on Public Policy and Administration.) It seems to me, as an outsider (an economist, not a historian or a political scientist.), that this subtitle is a good description of Vincent's own intellectual style. He combined all the virtues of the classical historian with intellectual curiosity about new ideas in political science. He was as much at home writing about the first four years of the Mitterrand Presidency as he was studying the biographies of nineteenth century prefects. He was keenly interested in old institutions such as freemasonry, yet was among the first to understand the significance of new developments such as privatization. He encouraged students to pursue the archival work he loved, but was tolerant of those who adopted a quite different approach. (In both cases, of course, their work was subjected to close and sceptical examination.) It is highly appropriate, in a volume in memory of Vincent, that Peter Hall should quote the statement attributed to Santayana that those who neglect history are doomed to repeat it. But Vincent was also receptive to what could be learned from a theoretical framework. When interviewing prospective prize research fellows, he could always be relied on to engage with even the most abstract presentation.

Engagement is, for me, the key. One of the pleasures of talking to Vincent was his openness to cross-disciplinary exchange. He did not like the methods adopted by most economists and was—rightly—suspicious of their influence on policy making. But he was willing to engage. As is reflected in a number of the chapters in this volume, he worked on key issues of economic policy-making, such as regulation, industrial policy, and privatization, the last of which he described as 'a gold mine for political scientists' (1999: 173). Moreover, he was willing to work with economists, notably in his collaboration with John Vickers on The Politics of Privatization in Western Europe (1989). Today, the subjects being studied by economists and by political scientists often over-lap, but they seem too often to be talking past each other. Economists are unduly reliant on simplistic models that lack institutional grounding (median voter models seem to have too large a role); political scientists seem often to work with implicit models of the economy that lack the insights of modern economic theory or fail to capture general equilibrium reactions. What is needed is more genuine engagement of the kind that Vincent practised.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Governing Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 488

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.