Democratic Consolidation in Eastern Europe - Vol. 2

By Jan Zielonka; Alex Pravda | Go to book overview

Finally, we can infer from our evidence that differences in state responses to the West from the beginning of the transition do not appear to be grounded in differences in mass attitudes at least at the point in the transition captured in the surveys discussed here. As with many issues to do with the post-communist transformation, elite responses 29 —both in the East and the West—may have a substantial impact on policies adopted, whether this might be NATO or EU expansion. Over time, these policy choices may also have an effect on mass attitudes (though data available to the authors from subsequent surveys in Russia in 1995, 1996, and 1998 indicate that the shift in public opinion towards the West has not been enormous). But, at least for the period analysed here, there is little reason to believe that mass constraints to building support for the West in Eastern Europe have been powerful ones.


Appendix: The Surveys

Sampling frames and stratification procedures varied between countries: in some countries census information was considered more reliable; in others electoral records were preferred; in other random route procedures were adopted with a Kish grid being used for final respondent selection. Each of these strategies was considered to be the most effective approach within the countries in which it was adopted.

Response rates were generally high despite a number of non-contacts in some countries. As far as can be told, given the fallibilities of official data, non-response biases are predictably like those in the West. Compared to Census data non-respondents tend to be older and to have lower levels of education. Non-response resulted mainly from non-contacts and refusals. Table 8.A1 summarizes the main characteristics of the surveys.

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Democratic Consolidation in Eastern Europe - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford Studies in Democratization ii
  • Democratic Consolidation in Eastern Europe iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Tables x
  • List of Contributors xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I Comparative Perspectives 30
  • 1: Western Actors and the Promotion of Democracy 31
  • 2: Regionalization and Democratic Consolidation 58
  • 3: The Impact of External Economic Factors 76
  • 4: International Security and Democracy Building 112
  • 5: The Internationalization of Ethnic Strife 139
  • 6: International Migration and the Consolidation of Democracy 163
  • Appendix 191
  • 7: Crime, Corruption, and Politics 192
  • Appendix: the Surveys 250
  • Part II National Perspectives 256
  • 9: Estonia and Latvia 257
  • 10: Hungary 281
  • 11: Poland 311
  • 12: The Czech Republic 325
  • 13: Slovakia 363
  • 14: Building Democracy in Romania 383
  • 15: Bulgaria and Macedonia 413
  • 16: Former Yugoslavia 437
  • 17: Belarus and Ukraine 455
  • 18: Russia and the West 485
  • 19: Conclusions 511
  • Select Bibliography 533
  • Index 542
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