Parties without Partisans: Political Change in Advanced Industrial Democracies

By Martin P. Wattenberg; Russell J. Dalton | Go to book overview

List of Tables
2.1 Trends in Party Identification over Time 25
2.2 Age and Partisanship Relationships over Time 31
2.3 Education and Partisanship Relationships over Time 33
2.4 Cognitive Mobilization and Partisanship Relationships over Time 34
2.5 Satisfaction with Democracy and Partisanship Relationships over Time 35
3.1 National Trends in Electoral Volatility, 1950s-1990s 41
3.2 Trends in Effective Number of Parties, 1950s-1990s. 43
3.3 Survey-Based Measures of Volatility 44
3.4 Split-Ticket Voting 47
3.5 Late Timing of Electoral Decision 48
3.6 Ratio of Candidate and Party Mentions in Election Stories 52
3.7 Patterns of Party and Candidate Preferences 53
3.8 Voting Behaviour by Patterns of Party and Candidate Preferences 53
3.9 Interest in Politics and Elections 57
3.10 Trends in American Campaign Activity 58
3.11 Cross-national Trends in Election Campaign Activity 59
4.1 Change in Turnout since the 1950s among the Voting Age Population 72
4.2 Standardized Turnout Rates by Decade for Scandinavia and Other OECD Nations 74
5.1 Aggregate Party Enrolment 89
5.2 Member/Electorate Ratio 90
5.3 Self-Reported Party Membership 91
5.4 Democratic Parties with Membership-Based Organization Prior to the Second World War 93
5.5 Self-Reported Party Participation Rates 96
5.6 Organizational Density by Party 98
6.1 Three Stages in the Development of Election Campaigning 104
6.2 The Campaign 'Environment' 107
6.3 Party Election Campaign Expenditure in Western European Countries, 1960s-1990s 114
6.4 Average Changes in the Resources of West European Political Parties 117

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Parties without Partisans: Political Change in Advanced Industrial Democracies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Comparative Politics ii
  • Parties Without Partisans iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Tables x
  • Notes on Contributors xii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I Parties in the Electorate 17
  • 2 the Decline of Party Identifications 19
  • Appendix 62
  • 4 the Decline of Party Mobilization 64
  • Part II Parties as Political Organizations 77
  • 5 Parties Without Members? 79
  • Quantitative Changes in the Resourcing of West European Political Parties 126
  • Appendix Leadership Selectorate Details, by Party 150
  • Part III Parties in Government 155
  • 8 Parties in Legislatures: 157
  • 9 Parties at the Core of Government 180
  • Appendix 204
  • 11 on the Primacy of Party in Government 238
  • Conclusion 259
  • Appendix 285
  • References 286
  • Index 311
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