Parties without Partisans: Political Change in Advanced Industrial Democracies

By Martin P. Wattenberg; Russell J. Dalton | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Shaun Bowler is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Riverside. Bowler is co-editor of Party Discipline and Parliamentary Government (1999), co-editor of Electoral Strategies and Political Marketing (1992), and co-author of Demanding Choices: Opinions, Voting and Direct Democracy (1998), which concerns the process of direct democracy. He is currently working on the relationship between direct and representative democracy.

Miki L. Caul is a doctoral candidate in political science at the University of California, Irvine, and a research fellow in the Center for the Study of Democracy. Her research interests focus on political parties, participation, and women in politics. Her doctoral research examines the factors facilitating the representation of women in parties within the OECD nations. She has published her research in Party Politics, Comparative Political Studies, and Pilipinas.

Russell J. Dalton is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Study of Democracy at the University of California, Irvine. His scholarly interests include comparative political behaviour, political parties, social movements, and empirical democratic theory. He is author of The Green Rainbow: Environmental Interest Groups in Western Europe (1994), Citizen Politics, 2nd edn. (1996), and Politics in Germany (1993); he co-authored Critical Masses: Citizens, Environmental Destruction, and Nuclear Weapons Production in Russia and the United States (1999), Germany Transformed (1981); and he is editor of Germans Divided (1996), The New Germany Votes (1993), Challenging the Political Order (1990), and Electoral Change (1984).

David M. Farrell is Jean Monnet Chair in European politics at the University of Manchester. He is an executive member (from 1998) of the Political Organizations and Parties section of the American Political Science Association, joint editor of Party Politics, and author of numerous papers on parties, campaigns, and electoral systems. His recent books include: Party Discipline and Parliamentary Government (co-edited, 1999), and Electoral Systems: A Comparative Introduction (2000).

Mark M. Gray is a doctoral candidate in political science at the University of California, Irvine. His research emphases include political participation, the mass media, democratization, and time-series cross-sectional data analysis. His research on explaining declines in voting turnout has appeared in Comparative Political Studies.

-xii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Parties without Partisans: Political Change in Advanced Industrial Democracies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Comparative Politics ii
  • Parties Without Partisans iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Tables x
  • Notes on Contributors xii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I Parties in the Electorate 17
  • 2 the Decline of Party Identifications 19
  • Appendix 62
  • 4 the Decline of Party Mobilization 64
  • Part II Parties as Political Organizations 77
  • 5 Parties Without Members? 79
  • Quantitative Changes in the Resourcing of West European Political Parties 126
  • Appendix Leadership Selectorate Details, by Party 150
  • Part III Parties in Government 155
  • 8 Parties in Legislatures: 157
  • 9 Parties at the Core of Government 180
  • Appendix 204
  • 11 on the Primacy of Party in Government 238
  • Conclusion 259
  • Appendix 285
  • References 286
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.