Biography as High Adventure: Life-Writers Speak on Their Art

By Stephen B. Oates | Go to book overview

Seven
The Burdens of Biography

Mark Schorer

Many of you know the anecdote about Samuel Johnson and James Boswell in which Boswell, with his obsessive concern for the accumulation of more and more details of Johnson's life and character, was questioning a third person about Johnson in Johnson's presence, when Johnson suddenly thundered at him, "You have but two subjects, yourself and me. I am sick of both."

"Let this anecdote serve as my text, and in a more special way than the exasperated Dr. Johnson intended, namely, that biography itself has two subjects, and two subjects only -- the figure whose life is being re-created, of course, and the mind that is re-creating it, the scrutinizing biographer no less than the object of his scrutiny. Let me use it, too, to suggest that the largest burdens of biography are twofold: one, of course, on the man who has undertaken the work, responsibilities much more subtle than may at first appear and conceivably so enervating that he may well be tempted to throw up his hands and shout, "I'm sick of it"; the other on the ghost of the man who is not to be permitted the decent obscurity of death and who, seeing how he is being made to live, might well, had he a voice, shout, "I am sick of both!" And let me use this anecdote finally as a kind of warning, even as a request for forgiveness of what may well seem to be an exercise in egocentricity that goes far beyond Boswellian vanity. For I must be personal if I am to speak on this subject at all.

I spent some years in research for a biography and some more years in writing what proved to be a rather large book. I had not intended to speak directly about that book or of my experience in writing it. I had hoped to speak generally on biography as an art. I had written a biography but I had never read much about the nature of biography or how to write it. In preparation -- as I thought -- I have read a half dozen books, or more, on this subject, and I regret to say that I learned very little. It is difficult, but not impossible, to set up a definition of

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Biography as High Adventure: Life-Writers Speak on Their Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Prologue ix
  • One - Biography as a Work of Art 3
  • Two - The Figure Under the Carpet 18
  • Three - Walking the Boundaries 32
  • Four - Biography as an Agent of Humanism 50
  • Five - The Biographer's Relationship With His Hero 65
  • Six - The "Real Life" 70
  • Seven - The Burdens of Biography 77
  • Eight - Biography as a Prism of History 93
  • Nine - Reaassembling the Dust 104
  • Ten - Biography as High Adventure 124
  • About the Biographers 139
  • Index 143
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