Democracy beyond Borders: Justice and Representation in Global Institutions

By Andrew Kuper | Go to book overview

4 Transforming Global Institutions

Four Concrete Cosmopolitan Proposals

It is obvious that between theory and practice there is required, besides, a middle term … providing a transition from one to the other … an act of judgement by which a practitioner distinguishes whether or not something is a case of the rule; and since judgement cannot always be given yet another rule by which to direct its subsumption (for this would go on to infinity), there can be theoreticians who can never in their lives become practical because they are lacking in judgement … But even where this natural talent is present there can still be deficiency in premises, that is, a theory can be incomplete and can, perhaps, be supplemented only by engaging in further experiments and experiences … In such cases it was not the fault of theory if it was of little use in practice, but rather of there having been not enough theory, which the man in question should have learned from experience …

Kant, 'On the Common Saying: That may be correct in theory but it is of no use in practice', 275

[C]ontemporary globalization has not only triggered or reinforced a significant politicization of a growing array of issue areas, but has also been accompanied by an extraordinary growth of institutionalized arenas and networks of political mobilization, surveillance, decision-making and regulatory activity across borders. This has enormously expanded the capacity for, and scope of, political activity and the exercise of political authority. In this respect, globalization is not, nor has it ever been, beyond regulation and control. Globalization does not prefigure the 'end of politics' so much as its continuation by new means. The prospects for 'civilizing' and 'democratizing' contemporary globalization are thus not as bleak as some suggest.

Held et al., Global Transformations, 444

-137-

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Democracy beyond Borders: Justice and Representation in Global Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About the Author ii
  • Democracy Beyond Borders iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction: Walking the Tightrope 1
  • 1: Global Justice 7
  • 2: Why Deliberation Cannot Tame Globalisation 47
  • 3: Representation as Responsiveness 75
  • 4: Transforming Global Institutions 137
  • Conclusion: Responsive Democracy 191
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 219
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