A History of Jamaica from Its Discovery by Christopher Columbus to the Year 1872: Including an Account of Its Trade and Agriculture; Sketches of the Manners, Habits, and Customs of All Classes of Its Inhabitants; and a Narrative of the Progress of Religion and Education in the Island

By W. J. Gardner | Go to book overview

Eyre, to reimburse him for the expenses of his defence. On this occasion Mr. Russell Gurney pointed out that the ex-governor had remained in ignorance of some of the most painful atrocities in the repression until they were brought to light by the investigations of the royal commission. 1

In Jamaica, Mr. Gordon Ramsay, who had acted with extreme severity as provost-marshal during martial law, was charged with the crime of murder at St. Thomas in the East, but the grand jury threw out the bill. This case was subsequently adduced by Sir J.P. Grant as one reason for the abolition of grand juries in Jamaica. 2

A dozen English officers of high rank were also sent out to hold a court-martial on two officers, who were accused of wilfully ordering the shooting of three men during the outbreak. The court sat for several weeks, but the charge was not proved. That the men were shot was unquestionable, but by whose orders was not clear.

Some inquiries were also instituted into the cases of those who had suffered loss by the military occupation of the district, and compensation given to a limited amount.


CHAPTER VII

THE ADMINISTRATION OF SIR JOHN PETER GRANT

In August, 1866, Sir J.P. Grant arrived as governor of Jamaica. He was well known as an Indian statesman, and his appointment was very generally welcomed by all classes of society throughout the island. Effect had been given to the laws passed by the assembly to alter and amend the constitution by the imperial parliament,3 in an "Act to make provision for the Government of Jamaica." By the exercise of the powers thus conferred upon the queen, an order in council was passed on the 11th of June, establishing a legislative council in Jamaica, consisting in

1 Debate in "Times," &c.

2 Despatch to Secretary of State, No. 33, October 24, 1866; Report on Blue Book for 1870-71. 3 29 Vict. cap. 12.

-494-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Jamaica from Its Discovery by Christopher Columbus to the Year 1872: Including an Account of Its Trade and Agriculture; Sketches of the Manners, Habits, and Customs of All Classes of Its Inhabitants; and a Narrative of the Progress of Religion and Education in the Island
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.