19 Urban Questions: Teaching in the City

By Shirley R. Steinberg; Joe L. Kincheloe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE

What Is the Role of
Counseling in Urban
Schools?

David Forbes

The role of the urban school counselor today is to promote the whole development of all school community members as well as that of the school community itself. By whole development I mean not only the advancement of cognitive, intellectual, and academic abilities but also emotional, moral, social, spiritual, physical, and aesthetic ones. All community members means teachers, administrators, parents, and staff as well as every student. And by school community I mean the entire school culture as a living organism, including the quality of its relationships.

This holistic, compassionate counseling replaces the kind whereby counselors' primary function was to process students as raw material for future economic competition and bureaucratic efficiency, accommodating the employment needs of the market or the government. Schools too often have served to reproduce existing class relations. Given that calculus, with the loss of manufacturing jobs and the need for fewer and highly skilled workers, millions of urban working-class and poor students become relegated to the trash heap. Devalued and neglected, they are left with poor-quality public education that contributes to illiteracy, attrition, and despair. Today, however, it is no longer acceptable, if it ever was, to treat education and students as commodities instead of intrinsically valuable ends (see Miller, 1997). Counselors in urban schools no longer can afford to play the role of functionaries in an indifferent education bureaucracy that shortchanges the people it is supposed to educate. It is wisdom that enables the counselor to see the greater needs of the members of the school community and compassion that

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
19 Urban Questions: Teaching in the City
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.