Britain and the Greek Economic Crisis, 1944-1947: From Liberation to the Truman Doctrine

By Athanasios Lykogiannis | Go to book overview

ILLUSTRATIONS

Frontispiece: Crowds assembled to hear the prime minister's first major speech after liberation in Syntagma Square, Athens, October 18, 1944 (Photograph courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, London).

P. 5. Galloping inflation. Five hundred million drachmae for an egg, November 9, 1944 (Photograph courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, London).

P. 49. Prime Minister Papandreou and the EAM ministers of his National Unity Government, September 2, 1944. From left: Elias Tsirimokos, minister of national economy; Angelos Angelopoulos, deputy minister of finance; Papandreou; Miltiadis Porfyrogenis, minister of labor; Ioannis Zevgos, minister of agriculture; Nikolaos Askoutsis, minister of communications (Photograph courtesy of the Hellenic Literary and Historical Archive, Athens).

P. 50. A British sniper fires on ELAS positions from the Acropolis, December 10, 1944 (Photograph courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, London).

P. 52. George II, King of the Hellenes, September 1946 (Photographic Archive of the Benaki Museum, Athens. Photo: Dimitrios Charisiadis).

P. 55. Three Red Cross ships bringing aid to Greece, November 2, 1944 (Photograph courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, London).

P. 56. Signing the UNRRA Agreement. After the ceremony, on the steps of the Palace, March 1, 1945. From left to right: R. G. A. Jackson, Lincoln MacVeagh, Ioannis Sophianopoulos, General Plastiras, R. F. Hendrickson, Reginald Leeper, M. Bellen (Photograph courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, London).

P. 63. Prime Minister Papandreou helps to load the first sack of flour into a truck brought in by ML, while Lieutenant General Scobie looks on, October 21, 1944 (Photograph courtesy of the Imperial War Museum, London).

P. 66. Sir Reginald Leeper, British ambassador to Greece, 1943—1946 (Photograph courtesy of the British Embassy, Athens).

P. 67. Sir Clifford Norton, British ambassador to Greece, 1946—1951 (Photograph courtesy of the British Embassy, Athens).

-xv-

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Britain and the Greek Economic Crisis, 1944-1947: From Liberation to the Truman Doctrine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Britain and the Greek Economic Crisis 1944—1947 - From Liberation Tothe Truman Doctrine *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Tables xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Hyperinflationand Stabilization 5
  • 2 - Political and Economic Background 16
  • 3 - Stabilization Policy Choices in Post-Liberation Greece 80
  • 4 - The “varvaressos Experiment ” 112
  • 5 - The London Agreement of January 1946 140
  • 6 - The American Aftermath 205
  • Conclusions 251
  • Principal Characters 257
  • Bibliography 263
  • Index 275
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