Henry M. Teller: Colorado's Grand Old Man

By Duane A. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
THE PROMISED LAND: CENTRAL CITY

Henry Teller left Illinois and joined the westward migration across the Missouri River. In the words of a popular Methodist hymn, Henry could say in truth, “I am bound for the promised land. Oh who will come and go with me? I am bound for the promised land.” He had never taken a trip like this one; nor had Teller ever seen scenery like that which rolled past the stage as it lumbered westward. It proved, he remembered, a “wearisome journey of 700 miles across the plains.” Teller's recollections were less dramatic than those of his contemporary Samuel Clemens who, leaving his “military” career behind, took the stage later that summer to Nevada. Sam (later Mark Twain) wrote:

Our coach was a great swinging and swaying stage, of the most sumptuous description—an imposing cradle on wheels.... We stirred them [hard leather letter sacks and bumpy canvas bags] and redisposed them in such a way as to make our bed as level as possible. Whenever the stage stopped to change horses, we would wake up, and try to recollect where we were.

The meals at the stage stations were often a memory savored only later, if then. As Clemens described, “Our breakfast was before us, but our teeth were idle. I tasted and smelt, and said 'I would take coffee.' ”

Teller and three other men arrived in Denver on Wednesday morning, April 24, 1861. The Central Overland, California & Pike's Peak stage had

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Henry M. Teller: Colorado's Grand Old Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Henry M. Teller - Colorado's Grand Old Man *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Prologue: 1896 *
  • Chapter 1 - Prairie Lawyer *
  • Chapter 2 - The Promised Land: Central City *
  • Chapter 3 - Mountain Lawyer *
  • Chapter 4 - Mining Man *
  • Photographic Essay: the Tellers and Central City *
  • Chapter 5 - Territorial Politician *
  • Chapter 6 - The Young Senator *
  • Chapter 7 - Secretary of the Interior *
  • Chapter 8 - “the Indian Question” *
  • Photographic Essay: Henry Teller's Era *
  • Chapter 9 - Back to the Senate *
  • Chapter 10 - The Silver Issue *
  • Chapter 11 - Year of the Jubilee *
  • Chapter 12 - Colorado's Grand Old Man *
  • Epilogue: “my Record is My Life” *
  • Bibliographical Essay *
  • Index *
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