Henry M. Teller: Colorado's Grand Old Man

By Duane A. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
MOUNTAIN LAWYER

Henry Teller had come to Central City to join his Morrison partner, Hiram Johnson. Well aware of competition, the firm advertised in Central's earliest newspapers. On July 28, 1862, this ad appeared: “Hiram Johnson Henry Teller Attorneys at Law, and Solicitors in Chancery.” At that time Central boasted a notable coterie of lawyers including Lewis Rockwell and James Belford, who came to prominence along with Teller.

Johnson had made a good start in a crowded territorial field of around ninety lawyers (at least nine in Central in 1862). Teller again emerged, however, as the pillar in the partnership. The firm became popular, if a survey of lawyers representing clients in the 1862 fall court session can serve as a yardstick. They handled by far the most cases listed in the Tri- Weekly Miners' Register. The partners also proudly announced in June 1863 that their new office addition on Eureka Street was nearly completed, and the newspaper bragged: “This will make their office the largest in the Territory; their business requires it.” The newspaper worried, however, that although it “makes the most convenient law office in Central City, ” it was not fireproof: “Their library is too valuable to lose, and yet will be very likely to go in case of fire.”

Johnson, as Teller soon found out, had become increasingly enamored with mining promotion and sales. He particularly became excited during the great speculation in Colorado mining stocks from late summer of 1863

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Henry M. Teller: Colorado's Grand Old Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Henry M. Teller - Colorado's Grand Old Man *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Prologue: 1896 *
  • Chapter 1 - Prairie Lawyer *
  • Chapter 2 - The Promised Land: Central City *
  • Chapter 3 - Mountain Lawyer *
  • Chapter 4 - Mining Man *
  • Photographic Essay: the Tellers and Central City *
  • Chapter 5 - Territorial Politician *
  • Chapter 6 - The Young Senator *
  • Chapter 7 - Secretary of the Interior *
  • Chapter 8 - “the Indian Question” *
  • Photographic Essay: Henry Teller's Era *
  • Chapter 9 - Back to the Senate *
  • Chapter 10 - The Silver Issue *
  • Chapter 11 - Year of the Jubilee *
  • Chapter 12 - Colorado's Grand Old Man *
  • Epilogue: “my Record is My Life” *
  • Bibliographical Essay *
  • Index *
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