Tactical Nuclear Weapons: Time for Control

By Taina Susiluoto | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3

TACTICAL NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND TERRORISM

Pavel Podvig

Although the end of Cold War roughly ten years ago fundamentally changed the face of international security, some of its remnants are still posing arms control difficulties. One such remnant is tactical nuclear weapons (TNWs). TNWs were one of the cornerstones of the confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union, and one of the first types of weapons to be slated for reduction as the Cold War came to an end. Today, it is important to examine the difficulties of TNW reductions, especially as these may shed light on the problems of verification, transparency and the essential political issues, that will condition the future of arms control between the two former rivals.

To begin the discussion, it is important to recognise that TNWs have no actual military utility. This is especially true if we consider the TNWs currently stationed by the United States in Europe. Neither the European countries nor the United States have made a secret of the fact that the primary reason, perhaps the only one, for having TNWs in Europe is that they help bind NATO together. In basic terms, for the United States and the European countries, TNWs play solely a political role. The pertinent question is whether this role still has any significance.

The situation in Russia is very similar to the one in Europe except that a greater number of Russian analysts believe that TNWs may indeed have a legitimate and useful military role to play. This belief is reminiscent of the old Cold War confrontational style of thinking, which maintains that nuclear weapons can compensate for conventional inferiority. This basic argument continues to be used by the Russian military. It is, however, plainly wrong, and Russia should not continue to rely on nuclear weapons to compensate for the deterioration of its conventional forces. The Russian Federation does

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tactical Nuclear Weapons: Time for Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 153

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.