Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: Cities in the Third Millennium

By Council On Tall Buildings And Urban Habitat | Go to book overview

PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURE


Liberating Urban Architecture (The Merging of the Virtual and the Real)

Peter Pran

Visionary creativity and innovative thinking in architecture and engineering are liberating us and allowing us to develop outstanding new solutions for buildings and urban design. Our close architect-engineer-developer collaboration and trust makes everything possible.

Our work and design visions are on the edge, celebrating complexity, layered meanings and instability ushered in by the 21st century. Today, the real and virtual worlds are rapidly crossing paths, exploding our perceptions of where and how we live and work. Boundaries of all kinds are breaking down, providing opportunities for change in a tectonic realization of existentialist architecture. The job of predicting and charting a course for the future while striving to re-invent reality is destined to become a global struggle. Our goal should be to move aside whatever stands in the way of innovative thought, to articulate liberated buildings and spaces that make lives richer and more meaningful, and to define a vision for everyone as individuals. Based on progressive social, cultural and political ideals, we are in a position to take advantage of interaction across all media, and to express the full complexity and equality of all people. This kind of creative collaboration, viewed on a universal scale, reflects the marvelous potential we have available to us through the integration of our professions.

As the mind is liberated by the computer's borderless realm of possibilities, all things tangible will also begin to reflect an increasingly open world of opportunity. Architecture will soon outgrow its dependency on the rules and regulations that historically have driven the creation of form and space, and will be able to address a demand for more sensual and multi-faceted environments.

During the 21st century, the greatest freedom and the greatest dilemma of human existence are likely to unfold. How will society evolve to accommodate global electronic connectivity while maintaining a physical sense of place and belonging? What kind of environment will incorporate transient communication nodes, marking only moments in space and time, into settings of geological and cultural permanence? Architecture will begin to reflect the influence of these forces, along with digital technology, to introduce a new spectrum of places for living and working beyond the current boundaries of design.

-425-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: Cities in the Third Millennium
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 760

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.