Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: Cities in the Third Millennium

By Council On Tall Buildings And Urban Habitat | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY

c
City: Defined for the purpose of this paper as an urbanized area managed and represented by one or several local governments, culturally and communally defined as city, with specific administrative and political boundaries.
City region: The general urbanized, ecological and economic catchment area surrounding and comprising one or several urban nuclei, all or any of which may be defined as city.
Climate-stable practice: A city's climate-stable practice is a practical commitment to lower greenhouse gas emissions by the year 2050 to an amount that is proportionally in keeping with the globally sustainable level deemed to be 3.3 tons per person per year in 1990 levels.
CO2-e: Carbon-dioxide-equivalent. CO2-e: carbon-dioxide-equivalent. Expresses the presence of all effective greenhouse gases as an amount that would be required in CO2 to achieve the same effect.

f
Fossil cities: The majority of modern cities not only depends on the safe supply of fossil fuels, their very existence, form and growth dynamics are explained by the logic of the fossil fuel economy. Fossil cities will be inoperable in a post-fossil era, unless they manage the transition to a renewable energy economy and supply system. The term 'solar city' is used here to polemically emphasize the characteristics of cities in terms of energy base and emissions behavior in contradistinction to those of fossil cities.

g
Greenhouse gas (GHG): Human activity effected gases that trigger global warming are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), chlorofluorocarbons, especially CFC-11, HCFC-22, and CF4. Their emission levels are in this document expressed as CO2-e.

p
Postglobalism, Postglobalization: These expressions are coined here to characterize globalization as a fossil-fuel induced phenomenon, and to denote the post-fossil era as 'postglobalized'. They describe an era in which globalization will be differentiated into local flows of basic food, regional resources and certain manufactured goods, and a time of a reasserted primary industry sector, especially agriculture. Globally it anticipates a time when primarily services and information flows will be global, but basic levels of economic dependency and sufficiency will be defined locally and regionally. As policy of local self-determination and quality of life improvement, postglobalism is already rising in

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