Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: Cities in the Third Millennium

By Council On Tall Buildings And Urban Habitat | Go to book overview

DESIGN CRITERIA AND LOADS


Performance Code Requirements in the Tall Building Environment

Robert E. Solomon

Chief Building Fire Protection Engineer

Brian Hagglund

Civil Engineer

Building risk and hazard from the threat of fire have been largely managed through prescriptive code requirements since the 1800's. Use of fire resistive materials, compartmentation features, and later, installation of automatic sprinkler systems and automatic fire alarm systems have worked together to make tall buildings extremely safe from the effects of a fire. Code prescribed mandates have worked very well to direct architects and engineers towards the necessary level of protection for the building occupants as well as the structure itself.

In the United States, many code enforcement jurisdictions have recognized the effectiveness of these integrated systems. While any number of anecdotal stories or narratives can be used to demonstrate this, perhaps the most compelling argument lies in the evacuation strategies associated with tall buildings. In the majority of circumstances, tall buildings have become a "defend in place occupancy" when the appropriate prescriptive systems and design features are present. In these environments, occupants are normally best served and protected by remaining in a given area provided they are not in close proximity to the initial fire.

The US code system is now moving to incorporate performance design options as an alternative to the long established, time tested, prescriptive design that has dominated fire protection codes and standards for so many years. A performance code, as defined by NFPA is essentially a document that states its goals and provides reference to some, but not all, of the approved methods to achieve those goals.

-619-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat: Cities in the Third Millennium
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 760

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.