Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology

By Sally Cole | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A N Y P E O P L E helped launch this study of the life and work of Ruth Landes and have encouraged me along the M way. Especially, I thank Marianne Ainley, Ruth Behar, Victoria Burbank, Jim Conley, Susan Hoecker-Drysdale, Michael Huberman, Ellen Jacobs, Lynne Phillips, and Krisha Starker.

For our conversations about the Schlossberg family I thank Ruth Landes's paternal cousin Emily Sosnow and niece Lois Karatz. Emily Sosnow has supported the project from the beginning and kindly granted permission to publish Schlossberg family photographs. I would like to thank Lambros Comitas and the Research Institute for the Study of Man (RISM) for an initial seed grant that supported my first trip in 1992 to the National Anthropological Archives (NAA) at the Smithsonian Institution to see what the Ruth Landes Papers contained and for continuing interest in the work. The Faculty Research and Development Program at Concordia University and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada provided subsequent funding. James Glenn, former chief archivist at the NAA who indexed the Ruth Landes Papers, was an invaluable guide. I thank the NAA for permission to publish photographs and to quote from Landes's unpublished papers and correspondence. Nancy McKeachnie, director of special collections at the Vassar College Library, offered wonderful support when I was there working with the Ruth Fulton Benedict Papers, as did the Library of Congress staff when I worked with Margaret Mead's papers. I would like to thank Mary Catherine Bateson and the Institute for Intercultural Studies, Inc., for permission to quote from the unpublished correspondence of both Mead and Benedict. I would also like to thank Jean Herskovits for permission to quote from the unpublished correspondence of her father, Melville Herskovits, held in the Northwestern University library.

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Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Ruth Landes - A Life in Anthropology *
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Series Editors' Introduction *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • Part One - Beginnings *
  • Chapter One - Immigrant Daughter *
  • Chapter Two - New Woman *
  • Chapter Three - Student at Columbia *
  • Part Two - Apprenticeship in Native American Worlds *
  • Prologue *
  • Chapter Four - Maggie Wilson and Ojibwa Women's Stories *
  • Chapter Five - Lusty Shamans in the Midwest *
  • Part Three - She-Bull in Brazil's China Closet *
  • Prologue *
  • Chapter Six - Fieldwork in Brazil *
  • Chapter Seven - Writing Afro-Brazilian Culture in New York *
  • Chapter Eight - The Early Ethnography of Race and Gender *
  • Conclusion - Life and Career *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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