Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology

By Sally Cole | Go to book overview

Prologue

AUGUST 16, 1995: Driving through endless stands of birch and pine bush, we knew we had arrived on Manitou Rapids reserve lands when a police car, appearing from nowhere, signaled me over to the side of the road, and an Ojibwa officer handed me a $300 speeding ticket. The speed limit on reserves is 60 kilometers per hour, a great deal slower than the 90 kmph on provincial highways. I had been traveling 100 kmph.

I had driven almost two thousand kilometers from Montreal in a Honda Civic Wagovan with my two children, Sam, age eight, and Isabella, age six, and was beginning to think the entire expedition foolhardy. I was also nervous, wondering how I would be received. When I had presented a paper discussing Ruth Landes's Ojibwa ethnography at the annual Canadian Anthropology Society meetings the year before, a few anthropologists had accosted me afterward to tell me that some people at Manitou Rapids were unhappy with Ruth Landes's writings. I was making a pilgrimage to meet descendants of her key informant, Maggie Wilson, and to find out for myself how Ruth Landes and her work were remembered.

We continued driving, more slowly now, and arrived in the small community of Manitou Rapids. Ruth Landes's descriptions had not prepared me for the peace and beauty of the place. It was early on a hot afternoon. There was no one on the streets. The community sat on a flat, treeless piece of land that dropped in a clay bluff to the Rainy River. The river could not be seen from the houses. Stark, unadorned, and unlandscaped pastel-colored boxlike houses and trailers sat in the open meadow. Lazy, soft white cumulus clouds drifted in the blue sky; a maze of telephone and hydroelectric wires and poles dissected the horizon. This landscape contrasted sharply with the spruce and pine bush that circled the lakes just 20 kilo

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Ruth Landes - A Life in Anthropology *
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Series Editors' Introduction *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • Part One - Beginnings *
  • Chapter One - Immigrant Daughter *
  • Chapter Two - New Woman *
  • Chapter Three - Student at Columbia *
  • Part Two - Apprenticeship in Native American Worlds *
  • Prologue *
  • Chapter Four - Maggie Wilson and Ojibwa Women's Stories *
  • Chapter Five - Lusty Shamans in the Midwest *
  • Part Three - She-Bull in Brazil's China Closet *
  • Prologue *
  • Chapter Six - Fieldwork in Brazil *
  • Chapter Seven - Writing Afro-Brazilian Culture in New York *
  • Chapter Eight - The Early Ethnography of Race and Gender *
  • Conclusion - Life and Career *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.