Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology

By Sally Cole | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1.
See also Alice Echols's Scars of Sweet Paradise: The Life and Times of Janis Joplin, a powerful study of how these contradictions played out in the tragic life of the rock singer who died of a heroin overdose in 1970 at the age of 27. A bright and creative adolescent, Joplin desperately sought to break out from the constraining femininity of 1950s America in order to live her own life. But she also longed to belong and wanted the even- tual security of marriage and family, what she called "that white picket fence” (1999:86—87). Joplin's radical "bad girl” individuality so challenged not only conventional gender codes but also the "earth mother” ideal for women in the 1960s counterculture that she was left alone and isolated.
2.
Richard Slobodin at the memorial service for Ruth Landes, McMas- ter University, April 25, 1991.

CHAPTER 1
1.
This story is told in a short, undated, autobiographical memoir en- titled "An American Education” (RLP, box 12). Other "Ruths” who studied anthropology with Boas included Ruth Benedict, Ruth Bunzel, and Ruth Underhill. I have been unable to identify who the other "Ruths” might be that Landes refers to here.
2.
In her memoir Notes from an Undirected Life, Esther Schiff Goldfrank, Boas's secretary, reports that she gave him this nickname during the sum- mer she accompanied him to Laguna Pueblo for a few weeks of fieldwork in 1920 (1978:39). It stuck, and many of his female students called him "Papa Franz” thereafter.
3.
Bundism grew out of the Jewish labor movement in Russia and Po- land during the 1870s and 1880s. In addition to being a movement of radical intellectuals based in Marxist ideology, Bundism was associated with devotion to Yiddish and to secular Jewish nationalism within East- ern Europe and was sharply opposed to Zionism and other conceptions of a global Jewish identity. The Bund (General Jewish Workers' Union in Lithuania, Poland, and Russia) was the Jewish socialist party officially

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Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Ruth Landes - A Life in Anthropology *
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Series Editors' Introduction *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • Part One - Beginnings *
  • Chapter One - Immigrant Daughter *
  • Chapter Two - New Woman *
  • Chapter Three - Student at Columbia *
  • Part Two - Apprenticeship in Native American Worlds *
  • Prologue *
  • Chapter Four - Maggie Wilson and Ojibwa Women's Stories *
  • Chapter Five - Lusty Shamans in the Midwest *
  • Part Three - She-Bull in Brazil's China Closet *
  • Prologue *
  • Chapter Six - Fieldwork in Brazil *
  • Chapter Seven - Writing Afro-Brazilian Culture in New York *
  • Chapter Eight - The Early Ethnography of Race and Gender *
  • Conclusion - Life and Career *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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