Indigenous American Women: Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism

By Devon Abbott Mihesuah | Go to book overview

2
Writing about Anna Mae Pictou-Aquash

The topic of writing about Anna Mae Pictou-Aquash opens the door for a variety of discussions, covering protection of sources, respecting the tribe and family of the subject, territoriality in activism and feminist studies, and the author's self-preservation. Writing the Anna Mae Pictou-Aquash essay (chapter 9) was a stressful exercise in addressing controversial issues that Natives know about but usually do not textualize for the world to read: the bad behavior of some Native men toward Native women, their lack of respect for tribal traditions, and the reality that many Native women condone their behavior. Some Natives might be disturbed by my bringing these realities to light, but my perspective is the same as that of many Native women who will not tolerate being victimized by Native men and other Native women. I have gone so far as to write about gender relations within the Red Power movement, but because discussions of ethnocentrism among tribes, personal knowledge of the behavior of some AIM men, and identity politics are complicated and painful to recount (and probably not very useful to anyone except voyeurs who like to read about such things), I decided to omit many of the original discussions in the Pictou-Aquash paper and the essay “Feminists, Tribalists, or Activists?” (chapter 12). Sweeping these topics under the rug, however, will not make them go away.

I was a senior in high school when Anna Mae was found murdered in South Dakota, and for twenty-five years thoughts of her have come and gone. When Theda Perdue invited me to write an essay on Anna Mae for her anthology Sifters: Native Women's Lives, I jumped at the opportunity, although I knew I could not do it without permission and assistance from her family. Long conversations with Anna Mae's cousin Robert A. Pictou-Branscombe and with her daughters reinforced my thinking that if I am going to write, then it needs to be about something worthwhile.

During the 1970s I, like many other young Natives, was caught

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Indigenous American Women: Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.