Indigenous American Women: Decolonization, Empowerment, Activism

By Devon Abbott Mihesuah | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Information on these statistics are found in numerous places: The 1990 Census; the Indian Health Service, Trends in Indian Health; Karen Gullo, “Violent Crime Rises for Natives, ” News from Indian Country, late March, 2001, 1A; Devon A. Mihesuah, “Indians in Arizona, ” in Smith, ed., Politics and Public Policy in Arizona; and Utter, American Indians, esp. 297—318.
2.
In my book, American Indians, 97, 98, 101, the most common stereotypes of Natives include: Indians are all alike; Indians were con- quered because they were weak and powerless; if Indians had banded together, they could have prevented the European invasion; Indians had no civilization until Europeans brought it to them; Indians arrived in this hemisphere via the Siberian land bridge; Indians were warlike and treacherous; Indians had nothing to contribute to Europeans or to the growth of America; Indians did not value or empower women; Indians have no religion; Indians welcome outsiders to study and participate in their religious ceremonies; Indians are a vanished race; Indians are confined to reservations, live in tipis, wear braids, and ride horses; Indians have no reason to be unpatriotic; Indians get a free ride from the government; Indians' affairs are managed for them by the BIA; Indians are not capable of completing school; Indians cannot vote or hold office; Indians have a tendency toward alcoholism; “my grandmother was an Indian”; Indians are all full-bloods; all Indians have an “Indian name”; Indians know the histories, languages, and cultural aspects of their own tribe and all other tribes; Indians are stoic and have no sense of humor; and Indians like having their picture taken.

See also Bataille and Silet, The Pretend Indians; Hanson and Rouse, “Dimensions of Native American Stereotyping”; Hanson and Rouse, “American Indian Stereotyping”; Hill, Solomon, Tiger, and Forten-

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