The Behavioral Genetics of Psychopathology: A Clinical Guide

By Kerry L. Jang | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
The Mood Disorders

The prevalence of depression has earned the disorder the title of the common cold of psychopathology.

—Dunn, Sham, and Hand (1993)

The mood disorders are among the most heavily researched in behavioral genetics. Heritability studies have shown that the magnitude of genetic and environmental effects varies considerably—from 0% to 70%, depending on the definition. The molecular genetic research is equally broad and varied. It has investigated a wide range of genes with mixed results: from genes known to control neurotransmitter and hormone systems to genes that have no known function.

Typically, inconsistency in results is something researchers dread. However, the variability provides the backdrop for an important theme in behavioral genetics—linking this disparity to differences in how and on whom depression was measured to address key questions about the disorder, such as: "What forms of depression are heritable?" Are specific symptoms differentially heritable? Is a general liability to depression inherited? Is depression in females the same as in males? What is the relationship between different forms of depression, such as bipolar and unipolar? The outcome of the molecular and behavioral genetic research on these questions has resulted in a shift in the understanding of depression from a broad and monolithic disorder to a collection of individual symptoms that vary in severity and aetiology. The notion that depression may not be inherited as a unitary disorder is highlighted by the frequently contradictory results from molecular genetic studies.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Behavioral Genetics of Psychopathology: A Clinical Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Behavioral Genetics of Psychopathology - A Clinical Guide *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface ix
  • I - Behavioral Genetic Basics *
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 3
  • Chapter 2 - The Abcs of Behavioral Genetics 15
  • Chapter 3 - Classification and Diagnosis 44
  • II - The Behavioral Genetics of the Common Mental Disorders *
  • Chapter 4 - The Mood Disorders 67
  • Chapter 5 - The Personality Disorders 87
  • Chapter 6 - The Anxiety Disorders 111
  • Chapter 7 - Substance Use Problems 132
  • Chapter 8 - Schizophrenia and the Psychotic Disorders 150
  • Chapter 9 - Recapitulation 165
  • Further Reading 172
  • References 174
  • Author Index 195
  • Subject Index 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 211

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.