De Officiis - Vol. 1

By Ambrose; Ivor J. Davidson | Go to book overview

Preface

Though Ambrose's De officiis has long been recognized as one of the major bequests of Latin patristic literature, its students have laboured under two significant disadvantages: first, the absence of a readable modern English translation of the text, and secondly the lack of a study which locates the treatise meaningfully in its original socio-cultural context. In a modest way, the present work is offered as a corrective to both of these deficiencies.

The Translation is intended to render Ambrose accessible to modern readers, and thus to signal the enduring significance of De officiis as a testament to the synthesis of intellectual influences which characterized late antiquity. Translating Ambrose into modern idiom while remaining faithful to the nuances of his philosophical inheritance is not especially easy, despite the apparent simplicity of his language; too often the results can be stilted or wooden, and thus of limited value in widening Ambrose's potential readership today. The version offered here naturally aspires to be true to the original, and to convey the texture of the classical and biblical registers with which Ambrose is working. It also acknowledges that not all of the author's complex range of semantic evocation can be caught in English (far less in an entirely consistent fund of modern English equivalents), and that one of the hallmarks of his style is the practicality of his tone. Ambrose writes as a preacher, and a certain discursiveness and rhetorical energy are never far away as he presses upon his readers the applications of his ideals or the splendour of their biblical exemplars. These features deserve to be captured to some extent in translation. Sometimes this means that the interpretation is fairly full or idiomatic by the standards of some patristic translations, but I leave it so in the belief that Ambrose's primary concern is to communicate in practical (and sometimes fairly unpolished) terms, and that, for him,

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
De Officiis - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Ambrose iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xii
  • Note on Cicero Citations xxiii
  • Abbreviations and Editions of Other Works by Ambrose xxiv
  • Introduction 1
  • II- Date 3
  • III- Model 6
  • IV- Themes and Perspectives 19
  • V- Composition 33
  • VI- Purpose of the Work 45
  • VII- Constructing an Ecclesial Community- Ambrose''s Ethical Vision 64
  • VIII- The Influence of de Officiis 96
  • IX- Latinity 105
  • Text and Translation 113
  • Book 1 439
  • Book 2 692
  • Book 3 802
  • Select Bibliography 909
  • Indexes 953
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 982

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.