The Exodus Affair: Holocaust Survivors and the Struggle for Palestine

By Aviva Halamish; Ora Cummings | Go to book overview

12. In the Shadow of UNSCOP and Terror

From mid-July to the middle of September 1947, three matters held the headlines of the Jewish press in Palestine: The activity, conclusions and recommendations of UNSCOP; the terrorist activity on the part of the two dissident organizations, IZL and Lehi; and the lengthy voyage of the Exodus immigrants. Toward the end of the second week in August the press began publishing news about growing tension and friction between Arabs and Jews. Compared with the other more burning issues, this seemed, at the time, to be only marginal. In retrospect, it is clear that, not only was the summer of 1947 a microcosm of the powers and processes which characterized the period between 1945-1947 and reached a peak during those months -- it was also a time of change and transition. Since the summer of 1946 the struggle for a Jewish state in Palestine had taken place along diplomatic channels and was accompanied simultaneously by well controlled and restrained activity against the British Mandatory authorities. In summer 1947, the struggle was transferred to the international arena, while at the same time, preparations were being made for the next stage -- a military confrontation with the Arabs.

The three main events of summer 1947 were mutually interactive. Clearly, our own main interest is with the points at which the Exodus Affair met each of the other two sides of the triangle and we shall open the discussion of the effect the events of summer 1947 had on each other, by examining the interaction between the Exodus Affair and the UN committee. Since much has already been written on the subject, we are bound to refer to the events not only as they took place, but also to the ways in which they were interpreted at the time and immediately afterwards.

In previous chapters we witnessed the early effects the United Nations committee had on Exodus and her cargo-load of immigrants during the voyage from France to Palestine. We saw how the Jewish

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The Exodus Affair: Holocaust Survivors and the Struggle for Palestine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • List of Abbreviations xi
  • Key to Coded Names xii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • 1: Crisis 1
  • 2: "The Yanks Are Coming" 15
  • 3: Crescendo 26
  • 4: A Ship for All Jews 43
  • 5: The Bird Flew the Coop 52
  • 6: Seven Days on the Seven Seas 66
  • 7: The Battle 75
  • 8: Where Now? 103
  • 9: We Shall Not Land! 112
  • 10: A Floating Concentration Camp 122
  • 11: Not by Bread Alone 132
  • 12: In the Shadow of Unscop and Terror 140
  • 13: From Catharsis to Apathy 160
  • 14: The Last Weapon 171
  • 15: A Change of Scene 185
  • 16: Each and Every One of You is Dear to Us" 202
  • 17: They'Ve Done It Again 218
  • 18: All Jews Are Comrades 226
  • 19: The Second Aliyah 241
  • 20: Who, Then, Was the Victor? 252
  • Notes 275
  • Glossary 293
  • Works Cited 296
  • Index 303
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