The Multiculturalism of Fear

By Jacob T. Levy | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

While writing this book, I was fortunate enough to be part of two, overlapping but separate, stimulating intellectual communities.

The first of these was the community of political theorists at Princeton University, the faculty and graduate students in the Program in Political Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values. Much of this book was presented to the graduate student Political Theory Luncheon, the seminar of Mellon Graduate Fellows at the University Center, the Research Seminar in Political Theory, and the seminar of Woodrow Wilson Society of Fellows. I benefited greatly from discussion and comments from both members of the faculty and my graduate colleagues. Jonathan Allen, Oliver Avens, Clancy Bailey, Aurelian Craiutu, Patrick Deneen, Suzanne Dovi, Denise Dutton, Jeffrey Herbst, Elizabeth Kiss, Walter Murphy, Alan Ryan, Roy Tsao, and Maurizio Viroli each provided me with a sounding board, useful insights, and/or written comments on some part of this project.

My greatest debts at Princeton are clearly to my faculty advisors, Jeremy Waldron, George Kateb, and especially Amy Gutmann. Professor Waldron suggested ideas and lines of reasoning that reshaped much of my understanding of my own arguments; most of Part III has been affected by these conversations. Much of Part I was written in a kind of dialogue with Professor Kateb. I have tried to show that even the morally individualistic liberalism he powerfully and frequently defends had to accommodate itself to the facts of ethnic pluralism and ethnic loyalty in the world. Professor Gutmann—in her comments on this work and related projects, in her course on Ethics and Public Policy, and by the example of her own work—has taught me lesson after lesson about political theory that engages with politics and policy. She has assisted, supported, and improved this work in any number of ways.

The other intellectual community has been made up of political theorists and philosophers who think and write about ethnicity, nationalism, and multiculturalism. Brian Barry, Joe Carens, William Galston, Steven Grosby, Steven Macedo, David Miller, Margaret Moore, Jeff Spinner-Halev, Yael Tamir, Iris Marion Young, Patrick Macklem, Wayne Norman, Oonagh Reitman, John Tomasi, and Melissa Williams have all read and commented on parts of the following, or provided ideas that helped me to understand some issue more clearly.

-vi-

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