The Multiculturalism of Fear

By Jacob T. Levy | Go to book overview

6 Incorporating Indigenous Law

Introduction

If a history of cruelty, a legacy of violence and injustice, is important to our evaluation of cultural rights-claims, there can be few better claimants to special consideration than indigenous peoples. Until the horrors of the twentieth century, there was probably nothing with which to compare the vast scale and scope of the mistreatment inflicted on the original inhabitants of the Americas and other colonized lands. While sometimes there is anachronism involved in the moral judgement of long-ago actions, this is not the case here. The cruelty and injustice were recognized as such by its contemporaries, ranging from Bartolomé de Las Casas and Francisco de Vitoria in the sixteenth century to Kant and Montesquieu in the eighteenth, and beyond. 1

Not all indigenous peoples have been treated with the same savagery; whatever the complaints of Scandinavia's Sami peoples, they do not include the enslavement and genocide practiced in the Spanish conquest of the Americas. Violent expropriation of lands has been all too common around the world, however, almost whenever indigenous peoples have come into contact with expanding modern states and empires. In the Americas, Australia and New Zealand, and South Africa, but also in Siberia, northeastern India and western Myanmar (Burma), Scandinavia, and Taiwan, the refusal to recognize the legitimacy of indigenous land claims has been central to the violent histories of contact between indigenous and other cultures. And the refusal to recognize land claims was often part and parcel of a refusal to recognize indigenous law in general.

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Multiculturalism of Fear
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.