Of Paradise and Light: Essays on Henry Vaughan and John Milton in Honor of Alan Rudrum

By Donald R. Dickson; Holly Faith Nelson | Go to book overview

Henry Vaughan, Orpheus, and The
Empowerment of Poetry

Peter Thomas

“And this also . . . has been one of the dark corners of the earth.”

—(Joseph Conrad, The Heart of Darkness)


I. “TO THE RIVER ISCA” AND “THE CHARNEL-HOUSE”

PICTURE THE SCENE! A FERTILE CELTIC ARCADIA RISES BEFORE our eyes:

... w here swift Isca from o ur lo fty hills
With loud farewells descends, and foaming fills
A wider channel, like some great port-vein,
With large rich streams to feed the humble plain

(“Daphnis, ” ll. 43—46)

Here, in “Daphnis” again, are the “vocal woods and valleys” of Henry Vaughan's beloved and distinctly Georgic Breconshire. Here, in “To the River Isca” his “vocal groves.” Here “the bubbling springs and gliding streams, / And happy banks! whence such fair flowers have sprung.” 1 This is the land to which he had come home from London, probably in 1642 at his father's bidding for safety's sake. And here (somewhere by the river below Newton Farm his home) the poet rapt, sits and sings as did, he recollects, Apollo, Daphne's lover, beside Eurota; as beside Hebrus Orpheus did; or Petrarch “On Tiber's banks, ” weepingly while Laura slept; or Ausonius beside “Mosella”; or SIDNEY (emphatically capitalized) murmuring “Stella” to the Thames; or most lately Habington anonymously mingling “Castara's smiles . . . with fair Sabrin's tears” by the Severn. And here Vaughan, in the aftermath of Civil War, recollects and echoes their songs of love and longing. Erotic pastoral will find safe haven in his Usk Valley. Or so, at first sight, it seems. But it is not the name of Amoret, the

-218-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Of Paradise and Light: Essays on Henry Vaughan and John Milton in Honor of Alan Rudrum
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 393

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.