Of Paradise and Light: Essays on Henry Vaughan and John Milton in Honor of Alan Rudrum

By Donald R. Dickson; Holly Faith Nelson | Go to book overview

Contributors

MATTHIAS BAUER, professor of English Literature at the University of the Saarland, is the author of Das Leben als Geschichte: Poetische Reflexion in Dickens' David Copperfield (1991) and Mystical Linguistics: George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, Henry Vaughan (forthcoming). He worked as an editor of Handbuch der historischen Buchbestände. He is a co-founder and editor of Connotations: A Journal for Critical Debate.

DONALD R. DICKSON, professor of English at Texas A&M University, is the author of The Tessera of Antilia: Utopian Brotherhoods & Secret Societies in the Early Seventeenth Century (1998) and The Fountain of Living Waters: The Typology of the Waters of Life in Herbert, Vaughan, and Traherne (1987). He has edited and translated Thomas and Rebecca Vaughan's Aqua Vitæ: Non Vitis: Or, The radical Humiditie of Nature: Mechanically, and Magically dissected By the Conduct of Fire, and Ferment (2001) and was a contributing editor of The Variorum Edition of the Poetry of John Donne: The Anniversaries, Epicedes and Obsequies (1995). He has published articles in such journals as Renaissance Quarterly, The Seventeenth Century, Notes and Records of the Royal Society, Renaissance and Reformation, John Donne Journal, and George Herbert Journal, among others.

KAREN L. EDWARDS, lecturer in English at Exeter University, is the author of Milton and the Natural World: Science and Poetry in Paradise Lost (1999). She wrote such articles on Milton as “Wasting Spirit and Redeeming Time” in Milton and the Ends of Time; “Resisting Representation: All about Milton's Eve” in Exemplaria,Susannas Apologie and the Politics of Privity” in Literature and History; and “Comenius, Milton, and the Temptation to Ease” in Milton Studies. She is working on A Milton Bestiary.

N. H. KEEBLE, professor of English at Stirling University, is the author of Richard Baxter, Puritan Man of Letters (1982) and The Literary Culture of Nonconformity in Later Seventeenth-Century

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