South Asia in 2020: Future Strategic Balances and Alliances

By Michael R. Chambers | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10

U.S. MILITARY PERSPECTIVES ON
REGIONAL SECURITY IN SOUTH ASIA

Michael R. Chambers

Editor's Note: This chapter represents a summary compilation of the views and ideas expressed by the three military officers on this panel. Most, if not all, of the ideas and views in this chapter were presented by more than one member of the panel, and so no direct attribution is intended, nor should it be attempted by the reader.

Regional security and stability in South Asia are important national security interests of the United States, and of our military forces. If anyone did not understand this fact prior to September 2001, the events of that month and the succeeding months have made it abundantly clear. The possession of nuclear weapons by both India and Pakistan, coupled with their periodic crises, has for many years worried American military and security analysts. But the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and on the Pentagon in Washington, DC, brought the concerns about regional security in South Asia to the fore. India, and especially Pakistan, is playing very important roles in the global war on terrorism, and yet tensions between these countries could complicate the efforts in that war.

One of the most important ways for the U.S. military to promote regional security and stability in South Asia is through military-to- military relationships and exchanges. These ties can exist on numerous different levels, ranging from annual dialogues between defense secretaries/ministers to junior officers attending staff colleges in other countries. The United States benefits from these

-231-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
South Asia in 2020: Future Strategic Balances and Alliances
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 499

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.